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seen Sep 30 at 15:20

I speak UK English with a slight scottish twist


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
23
awarded  Yearling
Dec
30
revised In English, how do we use the polite form of address to somebody?
added 145 characters in body
Dec
30
answered In English, how do we use the polite form of address to somebody?
Aug
23
awarded  Yearling
May
25
answered Is the phrase “I just sucked it out of my thumb” used in American English?
Dec
4
comment login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
I see what you're saying but it's the "with" that I have trouble with. I suppose if it said "Authentication (noun) with X" I'd accept that so I see your point. It may be that my experience of seeing "login" as a verb is blocking my parsing, like the famous "The old man the boats" sentence. Fair enough.
Dec
4
comment What's the logical opposite to “onboarding”?
@Marthaª -yes, I think perhaps as onboarding seems more used and the process referred to as "offboarding" is often buried in a maze of euphemisms. Eg at IBM, we had Career Transition Programs and goodness knows what else.
Dec
4
comment login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
And I should have included the URL; please see oed.com/loginpage
Dec
4
comment login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
I'd disagree that "Login with Athens" can be read as a noun. CF "Userid with Athens". I respect your opinion and knowledge so I'd appreciate knowing your reasoning here.
Dec
4
revised login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
added 252 characters in body
Dec
4
answered login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?
Dec
4
comment What's the logical opposite to “onboarding”?
Googling "hr offboarding" turns up enough hits to suggest it's a recognized term.
Sep
4
comment plural noun/singular verb and vice versa
I think the singular noun would be used more in the case where you are contrasting with a situation where a given error does occur. E.g. "An error occurs when we start the program without a file but no error occurs when the file is loaded"
Aug
26
comment Where did the “unavailable” meaning of “Out of Pocket” come from?
Never heard this before. Is it a US usage?
Aug
26
revised Inverse for the word “define”
added 327 characters in body
Aug
26
comment Inverse for the word “define”
Apologies. Ed is right that this is not a helpful answer in terms of this sites goals.
Aug
25
comment Inverse for the word “define”
@ΜετάEd - perhaps you'd like to take a wild guess at what the "-ify" suffix does to a noun?
Aug
25
comment Inverse for the word “define”
"A brief and pertinent mode of speaking." to summarize a few online dictionaries. From Latin with roots brevis +‎ loquentia i.e brief and speaking.
Aug
25
answered Inverse for the word “define”