375 reputation
1314
bio website None
location Melbourne, Australia
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jul 3 at 12:53

I'm a dev consultant at ThoughtWorks in Melbourne, with degrees in robotics engineering and computer science.

Python is my language of choice, but I'm good with plenty of others.


Mar
27
awarded  Famous Question
Oct
7
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
15
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
8
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
25
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
22
awarded  Yearling
Feb
23
comment What is the appropriate word for “following trail” or similar in English?
In addition to "mobbed", "mob mentality".
Feb
16
comment Ways to say “lose money in investment”
I disagree with 'The financial market has gotten my money depleted'. That doesn't sound like proper English to me. Certainly very awkward.
Feb
16
comment Why are there different ways of indicating gender for animals?
As an Australian, from now on I'll sing "Doe, a kangaroo. A female kangaroo..." :D
Feb
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Feb
10
comment Are “Pick up your socks” and “Have your socks bronzed” popular expressions as the antithesis?
Oh, my mistake, I thought you were saying you've heard it as an idiom for "You're not royalty, don't expect everyone else to do crappy jobs for you." The examples I gave were of idioms, not literal phrases.
Feb
10
comment An ambiguity problem with “the first thing you remember”
I agree that "what's the first thing you remember" would usually be interpreted as the first meaning, but if OP really wants to eliminate any ambiguity, "what's your earliest memory?" is probably the best way to go.
Feb
10
comment Are “Pick up your socks” and “Have your socks bronzed” popular expressions as the antithesis?
@Mitch In Australia, "pull up your socks" is pretty common, having the same meaning as "pick up your act" or "lift your game." (i.e, 'improve your performance'.) I can't personally recall hearing "pick up your socks" though.
Feb
10
comment Is “bettern't” an OK word to use?
Hah! Yes, you hadn't! :)
Feb
9
awarded  Suffrage
Feb
9
comment Is “bettern't” an OK word to use?
@FumbleFingers Fair enough. You are correct that I've never heard anyone say bettern't, my references to regions was just to say that a lot of people drop the had/'d where I'm from, which it seems is not a regional thing anyway. So, getting back to the original question, I asked it because I've found myself saying "You'd better put on your coat, .." and then thinking, "Oh, um, how do I finish this sentence? Surely bettern't isn't a word?" So the real answer to my question is just that I was missing the "had", so "bettern't" isn't necessary. Everything beyond that is just peripheral discussion.
Feb
9
comment Is “bettern't” an OK word to use?
@Mitch (Sorry for double post, but I wanted to notify Mitch and FumbleFingers, and you can only notify one person per comment. See my reply above.) (Also, I agree with Mitch that "You had better" sounds British and formal, keeping in mind that Australian English is much more similar to British English than American English)
Feb
9
comment Is “bettern't” an OK word to use?
Perhaps this is a cultural/regional thing, but I think "atrociously vulgar and belongs in the stable" is a little harsh... As I mentioned above, "You better X" is a pretty common thing to say in Australia, at least in casual conversation. Obviously you start to run in to problems if you want to put ", ***n't you?" on the end, but in general I don't think it's a huge deal, in itself, to drop the "'d" from "You'd better X."
Feb
9
comment Is “bettern't” an OK word to use?
@FumbleFingers I most certainly am a native speaker! Now that it's been pointed out to me, the fact that the word "had" is missing from "you better do X" seems obvious, but it sounds quite formal if I say the proper version out loud. Here in Australia I don't think many people (in casual conversation) would say "you had better." It would almost always be shortened to at least "You'd better", and then I think a lot of people have the tendency to drop the "'d" and just say "You better do X.' It may not be correct, but I'd say that "You better X" is quite common here.
Feb
8
comment Is “bettern't” an OK word to use?
Ah yes, 'had' was the extra word I needed!