330 reputation
18
bio website tltech.com
location United States
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Apr 16 at 17:18

I work for TL Tech solving problems like the ones you see on this site. If you're stuck and you just want someone to fix it for you, give me a call.

Contact Me


Nov
22
awarded  Commentator
Nov
22
comment Why “e.g.” and not “f.e.”? Why “i.e.” and not “t.i.”?
Because: Latin
Oct
16
revised Name for cognitive bias suggesting a person is special or important
added 230 characters in body
Oct
16
comment Name for cognitive bias suggesting a person is special or important
Agreed. I'm not looking for a disorder, I'm looking for the name of the trait that is common in nearly everyone such that they think that things that they don't notice in other people is believed to only happen to them.
Oct
15
asked Name for cognitive bias suggesting a person is special or important
Aug
29
comment “Unexpected” quotation marks: Why?
@Gilles native to where? It certainly isn't in the US.
Aug
29
asked “Unexpected” quotation marks: Why?
May
13
answered “Among themselves” or “among them”?
May
13
comment Use of commas before a quote
You have a reference for this? I'd love to see this style element written down somewhere.
May
13
comment Use of commas before a quote
I'm pretty certain that the answer is yes, though I don't know the specific reference to back that up.
May
13
answered “No restriction” vs. “no restrictions”
May
13
comment Word for unverified confidence without ambition
@BraddSzonye I thought that at first, but it appears that "armchair quarterback" is more like a "backseat driver" for sports: someone who not only thinks they could do better, but more importantly has specific opinions about the incorrectness of specific decisions that he makes known to those around him.
May
13
asked Word for unverified confidence without ambition
Jan
1
awarded  Yearling
Jan
1
answered “Special” or “specials”
Jul
30
awarded  Caucus
Dec
24
accepted Name for an inexact abbreviation
Dec
24
comment Name for an inexact abbreviation
@MartinBeckett, I think that's a stretch. The simplest explanation, and the one most likely correct, is that "Distri" sounds funny, and "distr" is unpronounceable, but changing the the i to an o makes the word easier to work with and plays off the fact that many people pronounce the root word "dist-ro-bu-tion", so it's believable.
Dec
23
asked Name for an inexact abbreviation
Dec
22
answered Is there an English idiom for 'your silence implies your consent'?