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location Toronto, Canada
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen May 19 '12 at 19:05

Nov
5
comment Are “reckless” and “feckless” synonyms?
reck as in reckon? doesn't seem so hard to remember...
Nov
5
comment Use of dash in a sentence
Personally, I refuse to accept the notion that an em dash is a fundamentally different thing from an en dash or an ordinary dash (or a hyphen), for the same reason that I would never consider a lowercase a drawn with a tail above the loop to be a fundamentally different thing from one drawn without such a tail.
Nov
5
comment What determines the meaning of ‘rise’ with no adverb or preposition?
This seems like mostly a matter of general reference to me: dictionary.reference.com/browse/rise for example. The meaning of "to revolt or rebel" is derived somewhat metaphorically from the other meanings, I would say.
Oct
26
comment Origin of “tootsie” or “tootsy” (foot)
@onomatomaniak de gustibus non disputandum est... I used to be quite fond of them. They give your jaw a real workout too :)
Oct
26
comment Origin of “tootsie” or “tootsy” (foot)
It may not be obvious where to search for things like this; try english.stackexchange.com/questions/1482/… for a helpful list of resources.
Oct
26
comment Is “man with the monocle” an established idiom or just a figurative expression?
From the Wikipedia article for 'monocle': During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the monocle was generally associated with wealthy upper-class men. Combined with a morning coat and a top-hat, the monocle completed the costume of the stereotypical 1890s capitalist. Presumably the author has (unintentionally?) combined this imagery with that of the Monopoly character.
Oct
22
answered Is “Technical skills precisely” appropriate for a list of specific technical knowledge on résumé
Oct
19
comment Is it correct to say “…battle between x versus y”?
There's some awfully strange clustering in those graphs...
Oct
19
comment “Oldest son or oldest daughter”
I would argue that it means what @FumbleFingers figures, for the reason that if it meant "oldest child", it would simply say so. Legalese is painfully redundant, but not simply for redundancy's sake. That said, it's conceivable that a judge in 2011 might not want to honour such a sexist provision...
Oct
19
comment Who decides the casing of newly coined words?
You may find, from a legal/PR standpoint, that rendering it as "SitePack" is better for the purposes of establishing a trademark; common English words without decoration tend not to do very well here, but portmanteaus and other such run-together constructs do.
Oct
19
comment Does “I’m available” mean “I’m single”?
The thing is, it really doesn't have very much meaning out-of-context.
Oct
19
answered Word meaning “compellingness”?
Oct
19
comment How can I break English L2 pronunciation habits?
... meaning "second language"? I normally see it written exactly that way; "English as a Second Language" (ESL).
Oct
19
comment How can I break English L2 pronunciation habits?
You do realize that the pronunciation of both 'soft' and 'hard' ch sounds varies a fair bit across Germany in practice, yeah? In particular, the soft ch of 'ich' ranges all the way from [] (or at least, a very indistinct [h]) to [k].
Oct
19
comment How can I break English L2 pronunciation habits?
What is "L2" in this context?
Oct
17
comment The pronunciation of 'interest', which is right?
See also english.stackexchange.com/questions/44503/…
Oct
11
comment 'Plus, …' or 'Plus …'
I don't see what's wrong with writing it as one sentence, and still having a line-break after the comma and a smaller font size for the second half of the sentence.
Oct
11
comment Meaning of “triple up”
Slang expressions with 'up' definitely appear in some gambling contexts; see my answer for example. I suppose it's possible that my interpretation is wrong, and instead there's a gambling specific idiom that chips go "down" when you wager them and "up" when you win them and thus put them back in your stack.
Oct
11
answered Meaning of “triple up”
Oct
11
comment Which version of English influenced the other? British / American
I don't think this is a meaningful question. Which of two species is a more accurate representation of their common evolutionary ancestor? What does that even mean, and how would you quantify it?