1,224 reputation
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location Toronto, Canada
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen May 19 '12 at 19:05

Nov
21
comment Can I use “but” at the beginning of a sentence?
In the first sentence, "but" is a synonym for "except".
Nov
21
answered What does “Don’t leave your brains at the door,” mean? Is this an idiom, or just frequently used phrase?
Nov
20
comment Where does the phrase “get a bye” come from?
In the tournaments I've seen for other games and sports, a "bye" is simply advancing to the next round for lack of an opponent, with no obligation to play solitaire while waiting.
Nov
20
comment The word for “?!” or “!?”
By my reading of the Unicode Consortium's rules, a huge chunk of Unicode code points are explicitly not supposed to be there (i.e. their presence clashes with the stated purpose of Unicode), but they are :/
Nov
12
comment Difference between “Excuse me” and “Sorry”
The amazing thing is the way in which the upper class folk sound less refined than the people who are trying to pretend to be them. I mean, really, not excusing yourself at all for a belch?
Nov
12
comment Is it considered proper English to say “You best be…” or “You'd best…”?
This idiom sounds rather aggressive to me, carrying an implied threat that the speaker will take some undesired action if the listener does not do what is suggested.
Nov
12
answered What are representative examples of exaggerated simile like “I never in a million years thought I’d see this.”?
Nov
11
comment Why bread crumbs and not stones?
@Gnawme strange, I find that my gingerbread contains quite little fiber. Maybe I should find another recipe?
Nov
11
comment Difference between “Excuse me” and “Sorry”
Normally one says "excuse me" when attempting to get past someone on the subway, and "sorry" when bumping into them after failing to get past smoothly.
Nov
7
comment Antonym of “faction”
I'm confused; are you really looking for an antonym, or a synonym?
Nov
7
comment Word for viewing angle
+1 important point. "Perspective" works better in more figurative or metaphorical contexts.
Nov
7
comment Would 'determine' or 'decide' be more correct when talking about a target audience?
"decide to" is used for other purposes, and it not meant as a replacement for "decide on".
Nov
7
comment Would 'determine' or 'decide' be more correct when talking about a target audience?
You would be replacing "decide on" with "determine".
Nov
6
comment “When it comes to” and “with regard to”
This is an excellent question because it's exactly the sort of thing that an English speaker would never think about, but would probably find impossible to explain if put on the spot. It seems we can't answer it yet with quite a bit of consideration!
Nov
6
comment “Agree” vs. “concur”
@Isaac it is a Google Ngram.
Nov
6
answered Vernacular use of “Are we taking him in?”
Nov
6
answered Closest in meaning confusion
Nov
6
answered What is a good antonym for 'one track thinking'?
Nov
6
comment What does “duly” mean in the phrase “duly noted”?
@kiamlaluno Thanks for jogging my memory :) It still doesn't exactly seem like those usages are the overwhelming majority, though.
Nov
6
comment What does “duly” mean in the phrase “duly noted”?
"Duly noted encompasses only a tiny fraction of the usages of the word" This surprises me, as I can't recall ever hearing it used any other way. To be honest, I took it as a set phrase.