1,224 reputation
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location Toronto, Canada
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen May 19 '12 at 19:05

Feb
22
comment Another word for “apply”?
Why do you want to use something else?
Feb
14
comment What form of verb is “thank” in “thank you”?
@Tor That's only performative in a metaphorical sense - typically.
Feb
11
comment “Location” vs. “locality”
I think that e.g. in the sense of computer science terms like "locality of reference", locality also has a meaning like "property of remaining localized", i.e. unmoving.
Feb
2
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
30
awarded  Editor
Jan
30
revised Can “intrude” be used transitively?
A 'pr**o**position' is something quite different...
Jan
30
suggested suggested edit on Can “intrude” be used transitively?
Jan
30
comment What's the opposite of “oxymoron”?
"redundancy" isn't quite an antonym for "contradiction", though...
Jan
30
comment You are waking up the whole house
I doubt that alliteration plays into it. See the example in @tenfour's answer on my comment.
Jan
30
comment You are waking up the whole house
Thanks for the edit, RegDwight! That's much more accurate. Anyway for the OP, 'whole' is just an intensifier, but it gives a bit of a clue to the metonymic usage as well... "the whole <container>" is sort of a set phrase.
Jan
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
29
comment Why “out to sea”?
I would say set out to sea, actually...
Jan
29
comment “If we were to agree” vs “If we are to agree”
It's not about the actual probability, it's about the speaker's attitude towards the probability. "If we were to agree" emphasizes the speaker's uncertainty. "If we agree" considers the possibility without judgment.
Jan
29
comment How to answer “Is this John?” on phone
Canadians, too.
Jan
29
answered You are waking up the whole house
Jan
28
comment “Increasingly XXX” or “increasingly more XXX”
I would say that "increasingly more aware" instead implies that the fraction of the people whose awareness is increasing, is also increasing.
Jan
26
comment “Reach eye care to rural areas”
X can reach to Y, and X can reach Y, but X cannot reach Y to Z.
Jan
26
comment Why is it “knife” in the idiom, “Before you can say knife” though there are many shorter words than knife?
I've heard it with Jack Robinson a couple of times and with a million other things that were chosen to be appropriate to the situation, but never ever "knife".
Jan
26
comment Why is it “knife” in the idiom, “Before you can say knife” though there are many shorter words than knife?
I've never heard it with "knife"...
Jan
26
awarded  Civic Duty