1,224 reputation
48
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location Toronto, Canada
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen May 19 '12 at 19:05

Aug
23
awarded  Commentator
Aug
23
comment “This serves as a quick reference to verifying resource availabilities in Espresso”
+1, but also note that it's dubious to pluralize "availability". "resource availability in Espresso" is fine, but "the availability of resources in Espresso" might be better. Using a "reference" to verify the availability of resources also strikes me as a bit awkward, but I can't think of better phrasing off the top of my head...
Aug
23
comment Meaning of “How do I get featured?” in context of software development
More accurately, perhaps, "... so that my work will be featured..." depending on context, anyway.
Aug
21
comment How derogatory is “chicks” when used to refer to women?
Is there really a way to measure the degree to which something is derogatory?
Aug
21
comment Use of “and lo” in a sentence
It should be noted that "and lo" is fairly archaic - the sort of phrasing you expect in traditional fairy tales, not in modern spoken English.
Aug
21
comment Is “take care” always a friendly utterance or can it sometimes be considered threatening?
It's possible that it was simply meant to be dripping with sarcasm; "best wishes to you (not really, scum!)".
Aug
21
comment Is (or was) the exclamation “Nuts!” crude?
Censors, in general, are not exactly known for their consistency...
Aug
21
comment Use of “in contrast to”
You generally can't replace "in contrast" with "opposite", really, because "in contrast to X" is written in cases where X does not have a clear opposite. (I would object to the assertion that "the 'opposite' of round is square", for example.)
Aug
21
comment How to distinguish between positions of prepositional phrases?
Are you looking for a grammatical term, or just what?
Aug
21
comment Is “close proximity” a tautology?
It seems as though "close proximity" is becoming less common in percentage terms over time; but I think what is really happening is that other uses for the word "proximity" are being discovered/created where it is used by itself. A google search for proximity turns up uses as a trademark, as the name of a video game, in the term proximity sensor, proximity effect (a term with meaning primarily in relatively new sciences) etc. - none of which would have appeared in the early 20th century as the relevant technology was not widespread, if it existed at all.
Aug
18
awarded  Supporter
Aug
18
comment Does the phrase “will ever be” include the past?
'ever' means at any time that qualifies. Only times that are in the future can be described by 'will be'. Thus 'will ever be' refers to the entirety of the future.