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Mar
22
comment Seeking Generic Word: Place where opponents fight
+1 for arena. While an arena can be a building (which is built to be a place for competition and spectating), the word arena could be used metaphorically to mean anywhere that you're going to compete, even without the more general definition.
Feb
3
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
It's actually from the original The Italian Job (1969) and has been referenced in Britain ever since :D
Feb
1
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
Guessing most Brits would know it is a big assumption, but I do think most Brits would understand it.
Jan
25
comment How to interpret “Jim Scarborough'd never carried one; that's the younger Jim.” in No Country for Old Men
I think it's likely that there are two Jims (not necessarily two Jim Scarboroughs) and the point is a clarification on which Jim is being referred to. The other points (he carries one now, but didn't when younger) are possible, too.
Nov
12
comment A word that means: “to break someone's lie”? I want to aggressively point out that she or he is lying
You can also "expose a lie" directly.
Oct
20
comment Common phrase for “to name the issue exactly”
And I'd guess that this also evolved into "nailed it".
May
6
comment Same words with different syllabification
It seems to be arbitrary; i.e. they choose to divide it sometimes, and forget to other times. dictionary.com has a "Syllables" button which divides the word up into spoken syllables.
Aug
10
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
17
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
4
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
May
17
revised Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
added the first quotation with the modern spelling
May
17
suggested approved edit on Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
May
17
comment Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
Great information, thanks! From your post I was able to find a list of a few more of their sources and added one extra to show the first that had the spelling fair do's. Hope you don't mind :)
May
17
accepted Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
May
16
asked Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
Apr
26
awarded  Critic
Apr
26
comment “Gotta” pronunciation
Don't have time to get into a full answer but what you're referring to is glottalisation. English: "gotta". Cockney/Estuary English: "go'a". American English: "godda". It's not because it's a shortening, but rather how the accents interact with the words. You'll find the same thing with "bottle" and "pitter-patter", for example.
Apr
26
answered What's the difference between “get it” and “got it”?
Sep
27
answered What is the opposite of “in-image ads”?