464 reputation
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location England
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen May 20 '13 at 12:28

I'm SAMMEH.


Aug
10
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
17
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
4
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
May
17
revised Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
added the first quotation with the modern spelling
May
17
suggested suggested edit on Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
May
17
comment Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
Great information, thanks! From your post I was able to find a list of a few more of their sources and added one extra to show the first that had the spelling fair do's. Hope you don't mind :)
May
17
accepted Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
May
16
asked Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
Apr
26
awarded  Critic
Apr
26
comment “Gotta” pronunciation
Don't have time to get into a full answer but what you're referring to is glottalisation. English: "gotta". Cockney/Estuary English: "go'a". American English: "godda". It's not because it's a shortening, but rather how the accents interact with the words. You'll find the same thing with "bottle" and "pitter-patter", for example.
Apr
26
answered What's the difference between “get it” and “got it”?
Sep
27
answered What is the opposite of “in-image ads”?
Sep
27
comment Is there an equivalent of the spanish “que hueva” slang expression in English to denote that you feel lazy about doing something?
Also, can't be fucked.
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
Aug
26
comment “Agreed” or “agreed to”
To me, the former has the sense of the bailout package being changed and discussed and then being agreed on at the time of the meeting. The latter has more of a sense of the bailout package already being defined, and the meeting was just for agreeing.
Aug
22
comment In the context of food, is the phrase “portion size” tautological?
@CamJackson I don't think it's wrong to say that a property, such as size, is large or small, in the sense that large can mean a greater number, and a number can often represent a property of something. Though it may be odd, I would still consider it correct to say that a circuit has a large current.
Aug
19
comment What is the practice of pricing goods at numbers such as 3.95, 69.90, 198 called?
@MattEllen english.stackexchange.com/privileges/vote-down "Downvoting should be reserved for extreme cases. It's not meant as a substitute for communication and editing. Instead of voting down: If something is wrong, please leave a comment or edit the post to correct it."
Aug
19
comment What is the practice of pricing goods at numbers such as 3.95, 69.90, 198 called?
@MattEllen I believe the question being asked here is "what is the practice of pricing goods at numbers such as .95, .99 called?"
Aug
19
answered What is the practice of pricing goods at numbers such as 3.95, 69.90, 198 called?