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Feb
3
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
It's actually from the original The Italian Job (1969) and has been referenced in Britain ever since :D
Feb
1
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
Guessing most Brits would know it is a big assumption, but I do think most Brits would understand it.
Jan
25
comment How to interpret “Jim Scarborough'd never carried one; that's the younger Jim.” in No Country for Old Men
I think it's likely that there are two Jims (not necessarily two Jim Scarboroughs) and the point is a clarification on which Jim is being referred to. The other points (he carries one now, but didn't when younger) are possible, too.
Nov
12
comment A word that means: “to break someone's lie”? I want to aggressively point out that she or he is lying
You can also "expose a lie" directly.
Oct
20
comment Common phrase for “to name the issue exactly”
And I'd guess that this also evolved into "nailed it".
May
6
comment Same words with different syllabification
It seems to be arbitrary; i.e. they choose to divide it sometimes, and forget to other times. dictionary.com has a "Syllables" button which divides the word up into spoken syllables.
Aug
10
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
17
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
4
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
May
17
revised Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
added the first quotation with the modern spelling
May
17
suggested approved edit on Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
May
17
comment Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
Great information, thanks! From your post I was able to find a list of a few more of their sources and added one extra to show the first that had the spelling fair do's. Hope you don't mind :)
May
17
accepted Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
May
16
asked Where does the phrase “fair do's/dues/doos/does” come from?
Apr
26
awarded  Critic
Apr
26
comment “Gotta” pronunciation
Don't have time to get into a full answer but what you're referring to is glottalisation. English: "gotta". Cockney/Estuary English: "go'a". American English: "godda". It's not because it's a shortening, but rather how the accents interact with the words. You'll find the same thing with "bottle" and "pitter-patter", for example.
Apr
26
answered What's the difference between “get it” and “got it”?
Sep
27
answered What is the opposite of “in-image ads”?
Sep
27
comment Is there an equivalent of the spanish “que hueva” slang expression in English to denote that you feel lazy about doing something?
Also, can't be fucked.