3,005 reputation
1832
bio website careers.stackoverflow.com/…
location Helsinki, Finland
age 35
visits member for 4 years
seen Jun 17 at 8:48

I'm a second-language speaker of what I believe is a fairly "neutral" flavour of English (if such a thing exists), mainly influenced by British and American varieties. I tend to prefer British spellings but I'm afraid I sound more American when I talk. :-)

I take an interest in languages, their evolution and history, and all those subtle variations between different dialects and registers. After secondary school I was actually close to going to study English Philology at university, but ended up taking Computer Science instead. Now I am a software developer by profession, and languages remain mainly a hobby for me. (Not only a hobby, as I think good prose writing skills are important in my field. For the last 10 years or so English has been the main written language I've used at work.)

Besides English and my native Finnish, I'm nowadays quite adept at Spanish too (it's my favourite language in a way, especially if spoken with a Cuban accent and when drunk). My Swedish and German are rusty, but re-learnable if need arises.


Jun
12
comment Is saying “an obsolete remnant” redundant?
Thanks, "cruft" is useful. In this particular case, however, it wasn't really code — just a single JSP file that was essentially empty (but whose existence still caused a bug) — so, a countable noun would be preferred. "Relic", suggested by others, is close to what I was looking for.
Jun
12
comment Is saying “an obsolete remnant” redundant?
@RoaringFish: Yeah, "relic" is good. What lead me to think of "remnant" was the Finnish word jäänne, which actually better translates to "relic" or "remains" now that I looked it up.
Jun
12
comment Is saying “an obsolete remnant” redundant?
Thanks! (I sdded some context as a comment to the question.)
Jun
12
comment Is saying “an obsolete remnant” redundant?
Context whence the question arose: in a software project, a file that had been laying in version control for a year, originally added with some intention in mind, but actually serving no purpose whatsoever. What to call that file?
Jun
10
comment Is “might could” a correct construct?
@tchrist: Yes, that sounds about right, but I don't how see how it relates to my comment. Maybe you misread what I wrote. (I never used the phrase you object to.)
May
7
comment Does this device to restrict access to roads have a generic name?
Another, related name for them seems to be retractable traffic bollard.
Aug
17
comment What does “fly by the seat of one's pants” mean?
Thanks! Couldn't decide which of the top answers to accept, so I chose the most upvoted one. Also, I posted a small additional point that helped me understand the phrase.
Aug
17
comment What does “fly by the seat of one's pants” mean?
(Or alternatively: Stack Exchange, sadly, still largely revolves around software developers and their hobbies.)
Aug
17
comment What does “fly by the seat of one's pants” mean?
The context whence the question arose may be computer-related, but the question itself certainly is not.
May
28
comment Antithesis of “international”
Ah, missed that one, sorry :)
May
28
comment Antithesis of “international”
+1. Another very common example: international and domestic flights
Feb
23
comment Is the term “hack” more positive or more negative?
Further reading on Wikipedia: Hacker definition controversy :)
Feb
21
comment What word(s) describe a woman's voice as “sexy”?
Yeah, my dictionary says "(of a voice or utterance) sounding low-pitched and slightly hoarse" – this doesn't sound particularly smooth or feminine
Feb
7
comment What are some expressions that can be used to end an email?
@jae: "Regards" indeed sounds fine, and respectful enough, to me. :-) "Best regards" was just an example (one that I've seen used a lot).
Jan
31
comment What are some expressions that can be used to end an email?
@ijw, good point; I tend to agree. I've seen "Br," used quite often though, at least among businessy types here in the Nordics.
Jan
17
comment Shorter way to say “split [user story] into tasks”
(Forgot to add this earlier...) Thanks; I've actually applied scrum since 2005, and have generally been happy with it. (It ain't a silver bullet, and one should probably combine it with XP practices, but the key ideas of scrum and kanban do make sense, in my experience.)
Jan
16
comment Which variant of English should I use when my target audience is the world?
Of course, British English is a very common term for the varieties used in the UK, and claiming that "English" would be a sufficient replacement is rather loaded with bias.
Jan
5
comment What are some expressions that can be used to end an email?
Then again, are those mostly company internal emails? When emailing a customer, or a person you don't know well, it may, depending on circumstances, be better to err on the side of using some complimentary close (e.g. "best regards", nothing more formal than that).
Dec
23
comment Using had twice
Possible dupe of What does “had had” mean? How does this differ from “had”?
Dec
4
comment Is it true that the English have many words for hill?
+1 for quoting Trask's book. I was vaguely reminded of that too when reading the question (or well, a very similar passage in his other book Language: The Basics).