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Aug
19
comment Terms for collections of animals
Murder of crows, eh? Eerie. Never run into this feature of English before, but it's kinda fascinating (if bizarre); +1 for bringing it up.
Aug
19
comment When should I use “a” vs “an”?
+1 for clearing up any confusion. That blog post is hilarious; full-on outrage against an imaginary feature of English grammar. :-P
Aug
19
revised Is it “bear” or “bare” with me?
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Aug
19
revised All together vs. Altogether
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Aug
18
revised What are the following words called: Am, Is, Are, Was, Were, Be, Being, Been?
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Aug
18
revised Are there diagnostic tests to distinguish between proper and common nouns?
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Aug
18
revised Where should the comma be placed in the salutation of a letter?
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Aug
18
revised Why are days of the week proper nouns?
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Aug
18
revised “User accounts” or “users account”
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Aug
18
revised Difference between “ability” and “capability”
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Aug
18
revised Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?
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Aug
18
comment Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?
Retagging as per meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/72/…
Aug
18
comment Does “ever” apply to the future, or only the past?
Great answer. Also, completely off-topic, your circular reasoning avatar is awesome!
Aug
18
revised When can “have” be used without “got”?
emphasis / obligation
Aug
18
answered When can “have” be used without “got”?
Aug
18
comment Why is “ain't” not listed in dictionaries?
You are linking to Wiktionary, not Wikipedia, and I think that article is relatively helpful... "Ain't" indeed works with I, you, we, that, etc. but calling it "wildcard" would sound a bit misleading to me.
Aug
18
awarded  Scholar
Aug
18
accepted Contemporary written usage of “whom” in objective case
Aug
14
revised Equivalences between Australian English and American English
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Aug
14
revised Are “betwixt”, “trebble”, etc., acceptable in American English?
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