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comment Why do we use different prepositions in “no point in” and “no reason to”?
@StoneyB Thank you for your edited answer but the most thing I am concerning is that why to is used as a different role in those 2 sentences ? Can we say "There's no point to do that" or "There's no reason to doing that". Or the answer really is just like what Bill Franke said, that's the habit of native speakers ?
Sep
19
comment Why do we use different prepositions in “no point in” and “no reason to”?
Could you explain why 'to' in "There's no reason to do that" is an infinitive marker but in "There's no point to flying" it's a preposition ?
Sep
18
asked Why do we use different prepositions in “no point in” and “no reason to”?
Jun
24
comment How do native speakers guess the pronunciation of a word that they've never seen before?
@RainDoctor, thanks, I am googling for "Loan word phonology" ...
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22
comment How do native speakers guess the pronunciation of a word that they've never seen before?
+1 Thanks, seem helpful to me. Btw, as I said, I am not only looking for the rule of stressing.