7,144 reputation
11727
bio website ripple.com
location Oakland, CA
age 44
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 28 mins ago

I am Chief Cryptographer at Ripple Labs and one of the architects of the Ripple payment system.


Jul
6
comment Is it possible to learn English by just listening and speaking (without knowing formal grammar rules)
I would say that the vast majority of English speakers know that you can say "He smokes, but I don't" but not "He's not as happy as I'm" though very few have ever learned or even know the rule for when a contraction is permitted at the end of a sentence and when it isn't. (I can end a sentence with "when it isn't", but I can't end one with "when it's". By the way, the rule is that you can't contract a stranded clitic.)
Jul
2
comment Why the indefinite article in “my son has a swollen left eye”?
And, of course, "My son has the flu" suggests he has the same flu others have.
Jun
25
comment Are these questions grammatically correct?
@user82115 Sure. Imagine if I said, "Can you guess what my favorite means of transportation is?", you could respond with either of those. ("It is car?" is awkward, but not incorrect. "It's car?" would be a typical response in idiomatic spoken English.)
Jun
21
comment Word or phrase for a person who sets their watch forward to prevent being late?
@Mari-LouA It's the clocks on the walls that cause this to fail. And if she knows her watch is 15 minutes fast and knows she has to adjust for this to be on time rather than late or early, then what's the point?
Jun
21
comment Word or phrase for a person who sets their watch forward to prevent being late?
@Mari-LouA It's extremely foolish and imprudent. Say it's 10:00, but your clock reads 10:15. Your boss calls you up and tells you "there's an important meeting in 30 minutes". You look at the clock and deduce that you should be there at 10:45. But your boss is expecting you to be there at 10:30. Oops.
Jun
21
comment Difference between “all the” and simply “all”
If it helps, mentally replace "all" with "every single one of".
Jun
13
comment Is “wanna” more common with non-native speakers?
Standard English has a large number of spoken-only contractions. The most notorious is probably the one that replaces "I am going to" in "I am going to go to the store".
Jun
13
comment Why isn't there a verb following can?
It's not clear in what sense you mean "following". If you mean immediately after, why should there be? Many ways can a sentence be arranged so that a word other than a verb follows.
May
19
comment Why is “from overseas” grammatical?
I would view "It came from overseas" as no different from "It came from a place which can be described as overseas". The additional words add nothing. "Came from" already indicates that you are describing a place.
May
14
comment Can I say “I will work for this company for some time”?
You may want to say "I plan to work" or "I intend to work" rather than "I will work". To me, it sounds a bit awkward to predict the future rather than stating a present intention or expectation.
Apr
26
comment Does “it'll've” exist, and if not, why not?
We have lots of these in spoken English. Many native English speakers use a single word sound for "I am going to" in sentences like "I am going to go to the store".
Mar
11
comment The logic behind “better safe than sorry”
It is not clear that being safe is better, since to be safe one has to forgo dangerous things and those things often have benefits and advantages. Those may or may not outweigh the safety benefit.
Mar
9
comment saying “hello” when somebody asks something obvious
"Back to the Future" probably increased the usage. "Hello? Hello? Anybody home? Huh? Think, McFly. Think!"
Mar
9
comment Is 'my wife and I' correct English?
It depends on context. What is proper in an informal context is not always proper in a formal context. However, "I and my wife" is basically never used.
Mar
4
comment Is this sentence a run on? How to properly use 'such as' for this example?
Removing the comma after "unveiled" is sufficient to make it grammatical.
Mar
4
comment Difference between “submittal by” and “submitted by”
One tells us who wrote it, the other tells us who submitted it. Since those would usually be the same person, it typically makes no difference.
Mar
4
comment Difference between legacy and traditional?
@Joe.wang Traditional doesn't necessarily have any negative connotations at all. Legacy suggests that there's something newer and better and that it should/will be replaced.
Mar
1
comment Why do we use the word “oops”, if something goes wrong?
Do mean why specifically do English speakers use the word "oops"? Or are you asking why humans display the characteristic of speaking some word when they make or experience some kind of mistake or problem?
Mar
1
comment “With the purpose of” vs. “With the intention of”
"I've borrowed some Spanish DVDs from the library for the purpose of listening to native speakers trying to copy them." This sounds like you're going to get native speakers to try to copy the DVDs for your listening pleasure.
Feb
28
comment Is “legit” a legitimate word?
Using "legit" improves your street credibility.