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Apr
17
comment The pronoun, it is popular…why?
Jim Barnett, the Golden State Warriors TV announcer frequently uses right dislocation. For example, he'll say, "He just made another three point shot, Stephan Curry did." I suspect that what's happening is that midway through the sentence, he realizes that the pronoun was potentially ambiguous and so he adds the last clause to ensure listeners know who he's talking about. The pause between the clauses is often a bit longer than a typical pause.
Mar
15
comment English equivalent of Polish saying “A yokel can leave a village, but village will never leave yokel”
Of course, you can polish a turd.
Jan
3
comment How to rephrase this sentence in order to be more American style?
It's right in the sense that it is not a grammatical error, but it is clumsy and unpleasant to listen to. The extra words just get annoying.
Jan
2
comment How to rephrase this sentence in order to be more American style?
I find the extra words annoying and feel they make the sentence seem clumsy.
Dec
31
comment How to rephrase this sentence in order to be more American style?
Yes. You certainly can.
Dec
31
comment How to use the word “rave”
@Max They're really not that different.They both indicate extreme enthusiasm. If that's appropriate, then it's good. If that's inappropriate, then it's bad. It is always the job of a person who uses language to ensure he provides enough clues to resolve any ambiguities for their reader/listener. In your examples, we have an abundance of clues -- the word "madman" (clearly bad), the phrase "you'd better see it" (clearly good).
Dec
31
comment Why are dogs “neutered”, horses “gelded”, and people “castrated”?
Never use the word "neuter" in reference to a female cat. Call a spayed a spayed.
May
3
comment Tense selection to describe previously-developed software
"Used in the library development" seems awkward to me. Something like "used in the development of the library", "used in library development", or "used in the library" would be smoother.
Dec
10
comment “At the moment” or “in the moment”?
You always thought "at the moment" was the only correct way to say what?
Sep
15
comment What does “Shall be” mean?
It can mean whatever someone can use it to mean. Without a context, it's anyone's guess what it's being used to mean.
Aug
24
comment “Gassy emissions from these giant dinosaurs” vs. “… by these giant dinosaurs”
Of course it's proper English. How could one possibly argue that it's not?
Aug
24
comment “Tease” or “tease with”
Dictionary.com has tease listed as a verb used with an object that means to show something in a way designed to attract attention and interest.
Aug
20
comment How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
@sgroves You're imagining an unnatural form of emphasis that is weird. If you say it to yourself normally, you'll catch that there's a natural form of emphasis you put on "from", that almost makes the "o" go away.
Jul
29
comment Why do we say “in” a movie but “on” a TV show?
Movies are containers and TV shows are surfaces, just like days of the week are surfaces (on Tuesday) and months are containers (in January), and so on.
Jul
6
comment Is it possible to learn English by just listening and speaking (without knowing formal grammar rules)
I would say that the vast majority of English speakers know that you can say "He smokes, but I don't" but not "He's not as happy as I'm" though very few have ever learned or even know the rule for when a contraction is permitted at the end of a sentence and when it isn't. (I can end a sentence with "when it isn't", but I can't end one with "when it's". By the way, the rule is that you can't contract a stranded clitic.)
Jul
2
comment Why the indefinite article in “my son has a swollen left eye”?
And, of course, "My son has the flu" suggests he has the same flu others have.
Jun
25
comment Are these questions grammatically correct?
@user82115 Sure. Imagine if I said, "Can you guess what my favorite means of transportation is?", you could respond with either of those. ("It is car?" is awkward, but not incorrect. "It's car?" would be a typical response in idiomatic spoken English.)
Jun
21
comment Word or phrase for a person who sets their watch forward to prevent being late?
@Mari-LouA It's the clocks on the walls that cause this to fail. And if she knows her watch is 15 minutes fast and knows she has to adjust for this to be on time rather than late or early, then what's the point?
Jun
21
comment Word or phrase for a person who sets their watch forward to prevent being late?
@Mari-LouA It's extremely foolish and imprudent. Say it's 10:00, but your clock reads 10:15. Your boss calls you up and tells you "there's an important meeting in 30 minutes". You look at the clock and deduce that you should be there at 10:45. But your boss is expecting you to be there at 10:30. Oops.
Jun
21
comment Difference between “all the” and simply “all”
If it helps, mentally replace "all" with "every single one of".