6,941 reputation
11626
bio website ripple.com
location Northern California
age 44
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 5 hours ago

I am Chief Cryptographer at Ripple Labs (formerly OpenCoin) and one of the architects of the Ripple payment system.


Mar
11
comment The logic behind “better safe than sorry”
It is not clear that being safe is better, since to be safe one has to forgo dangerous things and those things often have benefits and advantages. Those may or may not outweigh the safety benefit.
Mar
9
comment saying “hello” when somebody asks something obvious
"Back to the Future" probably increased the usage. "Hello? Hello? Anybody home? Huh? Think, McFly. Think!"
Mar
9
comment Is 'my wife and I' correct English?
It depends on context. What is proper in an informal context is not always proper in a formal context. However, "I and my wife" is basically never used.
Mar
4
comment Is this sentence a run on? How to properly use 'such as' for this example?
Removing the comma after "unveiled" is sufficient to make it grammatical.
Mar
4
comment What does “tit-for-tat” mean?
What is "tat" anyway? And how can I get some? And then how do I trade it?
Mar
4
comment Difference between “submittal by” and “submitted by”
One tells us who wrote it, the other tells us who submitted it. Since those would usually be the same person, it typically makes no difference.
Mar
4
comment Difference between legacy and traditional?
@Joe.wang Traditional doesn't necessarily have any negative connotations at all. Legacy suggests that there's something newer and better and that it should/will be replaced.
Mar
1
comment Why do we use the word “oops”, if something goes wrong?
Do mean why specifically do English speakers use the word "oops"? Or are you asking why humans display the characteristic of speaking some word when they make or experience some kind of mistake or problem?
Mar
1
comment “With the purpose of” vs. “With the intention of”
"I've borrowed some Spanish DVDs from the library for the purpose of listening to native speakers trying to copy them." This sounds like you're going to get native speakers to try to copy the DVDs for your listening pleasure.
Feb
28
comment Is “legit” a legitimate word?
Using "legit" improves your street credibility.
Feb
23
comment Meaning of “let bygones be bygones”
To let a bygone be a bygone is to make that which is in past stay in the past and thus not affect the future.
Feb
23
comment In my example, do I need a comma before which?
It depends what you mean. What implies a large bias? The changes in the arrests rate? Or that the linear fit fails to fit the age profile?
Feb
22
comment Differences in uses of efficient and effective
@user1515834 You can execute a task efficiently but not effectively if you execute the task using few resources but in a way that doesn't give the desired results for reasons outside the scope of the task itself.
Feb
18
comment Between you and (“me” or “I”)?
@Henry Except "between you and I" has been consistently used since the mid 1700's -- that's way too far back to be hyper-correction.
Feb
18
comment Between you and (“me” or “I”)?
Your argument is circular. It does show that "between we" is wrong and "between us" is correct. But it doesn't help with "between you and me", because we don't know that "you and me" is a subject. If "you and me" is an object, then "between you and me" is fine, just as "between us" is fine. If you're saying "between [x] and [y]" must behave like "between [x] and between [y]", I'd argue there is no such rule. Were there such a rule, "The dog and cat is missing" would be correct.
Feb
18
comment Between you and (“me” or “I”)?
Woe is I! Mark Twain used the phrase "between you and I" regularly, as did William Shakespeare in "The Merchant of Venice". People have been complaining about it since the 1760's. I'm a native English speaker, and I see no problem with it whatsoever, as do millions of other native speakers who use it regularly. The only risk is that some pedant will insist it's wrong.
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
If the question really is just "Can you say 'I had have seen her'." then it doesn't belong here. (Perhaps on ell.)
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
As I read the OP's question, he's looking for a way to use "had have been" and giving just one example of a possible way. I don't think he's asking whether that particular sentence is grammatical. (But it's unclear.)
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
You can pile up a lot of auxiliary verbs if you're clever. "None of the dogs I have had have had guard dog training".
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
@Mari-LouA I'm not saying you have to use "had have been", just that you can, and it's perfectly fluent and understandable. In any event, you changed the tense, and thus the meaning (I'm describing the effect of the process of spending them, you're describing the effect of the fact that they were spent).