6,941 reputation
11626
bio website ripple.com
location Northern California
age 44
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Apr 13 at 2:01

I am Chief Cryptographer at Ripple Labs (formerly OpenCoin) and one of the architects of the Ripple payment system.


Oct
26
accepted Does “If X discovers that Y is Z” imply that Y is Z?
Oct
24
asked Does “If X discovers that Y is Z” imply that Y is Z?
Oct
23
comment “Directed at” vs. “directed towards”
I agree. If something is "directed at" something, it is aimed precisely at that one thing and nothing else. If something is "directed towards" something, it is aimed in the direction of that thing, and perhaps other things as well. Though the distinction is not quite as sharp as I may be implying.
Oct
22
comment Is 'town' or 'Barrie' a proper noun in this sentence?
You can't tell if 'Cousin' is proper or common in 'My Cousin Vinnie'. You can't judge by capitalization because it's in a title. And you can't tell by usage because the usage is consistent either way. I lean slightly toward proper because, at least to me, 'Cousin Vinnie' seems like his title. Like 'Prince Edward' in 'Our Prince Edward'.
Oct
22
comment The use of “exact same”
In both your examples, there is no exact duplication. The two shirts are distinct physical objects. If someone said "I wore the same shirt yesterday", it can mean either the exact same shirt (the same physical object) or it can mean a different shirt of the same design/pattern. Normally "same" does not indicate identical objects but similar ones, which can have varying degrees of similarity.
Oct
19
comment What term to use instead of “Company” to represent, well, a company
If it's a container that holds customers, then "company" is probably right.
Oct
18
comment What term to use instead of “Company” to represent, well, a company
If it's their database and these are their customers, then it should be "customer", IMO.
Oct
18
answered “At least as much as skilled as”
Oct
17
answered What's the difference between “null” and “void” in legal language?
Oct
17
comment What is the word for something that is punishable by law, but is not a crime?
Similarly, 'offense' works.
Oct
17
answered A word meaning the opposite action of recruiting
Oct
17
comment Killer Queen. The usage of noun sequences of length two and more. Ambiguity of nouns phrases in English
The short answer is simply that if it's ambiguous, it should be avoided. People, unless they err or are being silly, only use these kinds of phrases where context and common sense makes the meaning obvious. They are all formally ambiguous.
Oct
16
answered Is “thought'd” Proper English?
Oct
16
answered how to use verbs
Oct
13
comment Correct way to say “km^2”
@scottishwildcat: I agree. I did some googling and couldn't fine any evidence that anyone actually uses it. (And to Cerberus: Not if it wasn't 10 by 10 kilometers. It means of equivalent area to such a square. The idea is to avoid large and confusing numbers, primarily with non-metric units that don't have prefixes.)
Oct
12
comment Correct way to say “km^2”
As I use the terms, "square kilometers" and "kilometers squared" are different units. 10 square kilometers is a square with an area equal to 10 times the area of a block 1 kilometer on each side. 10 kilometers squared is a block 10 kilometers on each side, thus 100 square kilometers in area. I parse them as 10 (square kilometers) and (10 kilometers) squared.
Oct
9
comment Meaning of “give someone intuition”
I think it can mean two different things. I can mean to give someone a piece of information one came upon by intuition or it can mean to help another person obtain an intuitive understanding. For example, if we were discussing a complex subject and I had a simple analogy that you already understood, I might present the analogy to help give you a more intuitive understanding.
Oct
7
comment “Manifest” vs. “manifested”
I agree, neither quite means the idea underlies the theories. But it probably works anyway, so long as it doesn't subtly underlie them.
Oct
6
comment Why do some people pedantically cling to dying word forms (e.g. die, oxen)?
I have never heard the word "dice" used as in the singular and I find it jarring. "Dices" seems utterly absurd to me, since if we're going to lose the distinction between "die" and "dice", the only sensible way to do it is for "dice" to become both singular and plural.
Oct
4
comment What is correct: “I am an account manager” or “I am the account manager”?
Another example is if everyone knew that a specific account was involved. Then, if you were an account manager but you also managed that specific account, you could say "I am the account manager" to mean that you managed that specific account.