7,691 reputation
11929
bio website ripple.com
location Oakland, CA
age 44
visits member for 3 years
seen Aug 25 at 15:02

I am Chief Cryptographer at Ripple Labs and one of the architects of the Ripple payment system.


Feb
25
answered Does the word “God” in English imply that there is only one?
Feb
23
comment Meaning of “let bygones be bygones”
To let a bygone be a bygone is to make that which is in past stay in the past and thus not affect the future.
Feb
23
comment In my example, do I need a comma before which?
It depends what you mean. What implies a large bias? The changes in the arrests rate? Or that the linear fit fails to fit the age profile?
Feb
22
comment Differences in uses of efficient and effective
@user1515834 You can execute a task efficiently but not effectively if you execute the task using few resources but in a way that doesn't give the desired results for reasons outside the scope of the task itself.
Feb
18
comment Between you and (“me” or “I”)?
@Henry Except "between you and I" has been consistently used since the mid 1700's -- that's way too far back to be hyper-correction.
Feb
18
comment Between you and (“me” or “I”)?
Your argument is circular. It does show that "between we" is wrong and "between us" is correct. But it doesn't help with "between you and me", because we don't know that "you and me" is a subject. If "you and me" is an object, then "between you and me" is fine, just as "between us" is fine. If you're saying "between [x] and [y]" must behave like "between [x] and between [y]", I'd argue there is no such rule. Were there such a rule, "The dog and cat is missing" would be correct.
Feb
18
comment Between you and (“me” or “I”)?
Woe is I! Mark Twain used the phrase "between you and I" regularly, as did William Shakespeare in "The Merchant of Venice". People have been complaining about it since the 1760's. I'm a native English speaker, and I see no problem with it whatsoever, as do millions of other native speakers who use it regularly. The only risk is that some pedant will insist it's wrong.
Feb
16
answered The meaning of the word assumed
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
If the question really is just "Can you say 'I had have seen her'." then it doesn't belong here. (Perhaps on ell.)
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
As I read the OP's question, he's looking for a way to use "had have been" and giving just one example of a possible way. I don't think he's asking whether that particular sentence is grammatical. (But it's unclear.)
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
You can pile up a lot of auxiliary verbs if you're clever. "None of the dogs I have had have had guard dog training".
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
@Mari-LouA I'm not saying you have to use "had have been", just that you can, and it's perfectly fluent and understandable. In any event, you changed the tense, and thus the meaning (I'm describing the effect of the process of spending them, you're describing the effect of the fact that they were spent).
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
I think it's unreadable with a comma there. You can find dozens of similar constructions with no comma and I can't find a single one with it. "The professors I had have been helpful." "None of the books I had have been misplaced." And so on.
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
"I wouldn't know if she was a good therapist; none of the patients I had have seen her."
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
How about, "The best days I have ever had have been spent with my father".
Feb
13
comment Does “had have been” exist?
And you can have been had.
Feb
12
comment Why is endpoint a word while startpoint is not?
Probably "beginning" and "end", but it would depend on context. Using "beginning" makes it clear that when I later use "end", I mean it in the sense of conclusion, not boundary.
Feb
12
answered Why is endpoint a word while startpoint is not?
Feb
12
comment Is “Implement Improvement” awkward English?
@DavidM Right. But the plural can be attached to another word. Maybe that's cheating. "It is the Transportation Director's responsibility to implement improvement projects as they are required." It can also be used in section titles where omitted words are common, like "Implementing Improvement Plan" where there is an implied "an" or "the".
Feb
12
comment what is the difference between employ and employment
Also, "employ" can often mean "use", while "employment" almost never does.