7,861 reputation
12029
bio website ripple.com
location Oakland, CA
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Oct 26 at 9:32

I am Chief Cryptographer at Ripple Labs and one of the architects of the Ripple payment system.


Sep
26
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
15
revised Confused about the phrase “as little as”
edited body
Sep
15
answered Confused about the phrase “as little as”
Sep
15
comment What does “Shall be” mean?
It can mean whatever someone can use it to mean. Without a context, it's anyone's guess what it's being used to mean.
Aug
24
comment 'from' vs. 'by'
Of course it's proper English. How could one possibly argue that it's not?
Aug
24
comment “Tease” or “tease with”
Dictionary.com has tease listed as a verb used with an object that means to show something in a way designed to attract attention and interest.
Aug
22
awarded  single-word-requests
Aug
21
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
20
comment How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
@sgroves You're imagining an unnatural form of emphasis that is weird. If you say it to yourself normally, you'll catch that there's a natural form of emphasis you put on "from", that almost makes the "o" go away.
Aug
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
20
revised How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
deleted 1 character in body
Aug
20
answered How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
Aug
13
awarded  Yearling
Aug
6
answered is “How is conditions being unfair not an issue?” grammatically correct?
Aug
3
answered What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?
Jul
29
comment Why do we say “in” a movie but “on” a TV show?
Movies are containers and TV shows are surfaces, just like days of the week are surfaces (on Tuesday) and months are containers (in January), and so on.
Jul
8
accepted Name for title used before a name for phonetic or rhythmic reasons
Jul
8
accepted Romney, “regards to”, and disfluency
Jul
6
comment Is it possible to learn English by just listening and speaking (without knowing formal grammar rules)
I would say that the vast majority of English speakers know that you can say "He smokes, but I don't" but not "He's not as happy as I'm" though very few have ever learned or even know the rule for when a contraction is permitted at the end of a sentence and when it isn't. (I can end a sentence with "when it isn't", but I can't end one with "when it's". By the way, the rule is that you can't contract a stranded clitic.)
Jul
2
comment Why the indefinite article in “my son has a swollen left eye”?
And, of course, "My son has the flu" suggests he has the same flu others have.