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Jan
3
comment How to rephrase this sentence in order to be more American style?
It's right in the sense that it is not a grammatical error, but it is clumsy and unpleasant to listen to. The extra words just get annoying.
Jan
2
comment How to rephrase this sentence in order to be more American style?
I find the extra words annoying and feel they make the sentence seem clumsy.
Dec
31
comment How to rephrase this sentence in order to be more American style?
Yes. You certainly can.
Dec
31
comment How to use the word “rave”
@Max They're really not that different.They both indicate extreme enthusiasm. If that's appropriate, then it's good. If that's inappropriate, then it's bad. It is always the job of a person who uses language to ensure he provides enough clues to resolve any ambiguities for their reader/listener. In your examples, we have an abundance of clues -- the word "madman" (clearly bad), the phrase "you'd better see it" (clearly good).
Dec
31
answered How to rephrase this sentence in order to be more American style?
Dec
31
comment Why are dogs “neutered”, horses “gelded”, and people “castrated”?
Never use the word "neuter" in reference to a female cat. Call a spayed a spayed.
Dec
14
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
13
awarded  Yearling
May
3
comment Tense selection to describe previously-developed software
"Used in the library development" seems awkward to me. Something like "used in the development of the library", "used in library development", or "used in the library" would be smoother.
Mar
7
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
10
answered “At the moment” or “in the moment”?
Dec
10
comment “At the moment” or “in the moment”?
You always thought "at the moment" was the only correct way to say what?
Sep
26
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
15
revised Confused about the phrase “as little as”
edited body
Sep
15
answered Confused about the phrase “as little as”
Sep
15
comment What does “Shall be” mean?
It can mean whatever someone can use it to mean. Without a context, it's anyone's guess what it's being used to mean.
Aug
24
comment “Gassy emissions from these giant dinosaurs” vs. “… by these giant dinosaurs”
Of course it's proper English. How could one possibly argue that it's not?