797 reputation
410
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location Springvale, VIC, Australia
age
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Nov 5 at 9:15

Bill has just completed his Masters by Research in Computer Science and Software Engineering at the University of Wollongong. His research topic was in Lattice Based Cryptography.

Bill is currently working as a sub-contractor for small companies and organisations developing desktop and/or web-based applications.


Jan
27
comment Difference between the terms 'famous' & 'infamous'; 'valuable' & 'invaluable'
@PeterShor - Thanks for that Peter. That is probably closer to the answer I was looking for.
Jan
27
comment Difference between the terms 'famous' & 'infamous'; 'valuable' & 'invaluable'
I understand the Latin meaning of the 'in-' prefix meaning not, and I suppose to a certain degree it is correctly used to describe the difference between the terms 'famous' versus 'infamous'. I was simply using 'valuable' and 'invaluable' to describe a situation where it is not used in this context.
Oct
6
comment Choice of words referring to being attacked/assaulted with a glass/cup
That's a fair point regarding the word shanking, however, as I wouldn't expect to be penetrated by a coffee mug as I would a glass vessel/container, or a makeshift weapon for that matter, I was thinking along the lines of an act/offense that would cause blunt trauma.
Oct
6
comment Why does “air conditioning” always mean “cooling” and never “heating”?
Seriously, though, I had a similar understanding of the expression 'air conditioning' to mean cooling, as opposed to heating, whilst living in Victoria, Australia. It was not until I moved to NSW that I heard the expression being used for both. I suppose the meaning differs depending on where you live....
Oct
5
comment What phrase is less idiomatic than “softball question”?
@RobertCartaino - Glad I could help then. Just be careful, as some rhetorical questions may be considered hypothetical. Depends what you are asking though. Personally, I would use the expression blatantly obvious to describe the type of questions being asked by reporters (above) but, this too may be considered a cliche or idiomatic in nature.
Oct
5
comment What phrase is less idiomatic than “softball question”?
P.S. There's also the closed question, which which has a restricted range of answers, typically yes or no. Not sure if this is what you are after.
Oct
5
comment What phrase is less idiomatic than “softball question”?
There's the rhetorical question that (typically) does not require an answer because the answer is obvious and doesn't need to be stated. However, rhetorical questions can also be intended as a challenge, with the implication that the question is difficult or impossible to answer. Either way, I don't think this is the answer you are after. Can't blame a man for trying, though? ;-)
Oct
2
comment Meaning of Lyrics in “Diamonds on the Inside”
Good point! I never thought of it that way. I want to see if other people of this community share the same opinion before accepting this as the correct answer.
Sep
28
comment Origin of the of the phrase “feeling blue”
@ColinFine - That's a fair point, and I suspected that you would be taking this line of reasoning, so I did a bit more research on the topic and, the earliest reference that I was able to find that relates to the naval origin of the expression is in a US Armed Forces newsletter dating back to December 2003. The explanation mirrors that one in wiki, however, there is no certainty of where this author got his information from either. As a matter of course, I will email the webmaster of www.navy.mil to find out the source of their information.
Sep
27
comment How did the phenomenon of doubling words come about?
Oh, well! Hopefully, someone else will come up with a better suggestion. Good luck!
Sep
27
comment How did the phenomenon of doubling words come about?
P.S. You may also try this link. You may have better luck there.
Sep
27
comment How did the phenomenon of doubling words come about?
Fair enough. I thought that I'd just try, try my luck.... ;-)
Sep
27
comment Meaning of the valediction “Yours, &c.”
I tend to agree with the above answer since AskDefine offer a similar answer, except that its usage was in the USA by lawyers when they concluded a formal letter, or when they signed off in court papers that would also be read by a judge. It also makes reference to the letters in Jane Austen books.
Sep
25
comment When a foreign word or phrase becomes English
@Mark - I am not sure, either, but hopefully the wiki links should provide you with further information, or at least where else to look.
Sep
24
comment Is there a term for loanwords that are borrowed back into their original language?
As a post-script to my answer, it can be argued that words like democracy and Mesopotamia were coined to describe a particular process or location, even in ancient times. Other words, not listed above, could have simply altered in meaning like many words have altered in meaning in the English language.
Sep
24
comment Origin of the of the phrase “feeling blue”
@ColinFine - Actually, I have found the origins of feeling blue in three places (other than the wiki link which you have so kindly corrected), namely, www.answers.com, yahoo.answers.com, and www.navy.mil. While some do mention the Greek mythological definition, they all mention the naval origins of the idiom. Would you like to remove the naval origins from these links too...?
Sep
22
comment What do you call the body of water into which a river flows?
@Shawn - no problem! Hope you find what you are looking for.
Sep
22
comment What do you call the body of water into which a river flows?
@Shawn - The closest I have been able to find is an estuary, which is a partly enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. I don't think it is the answer you are looking for though.
Sep
22
comment What do you call the body of water into which a river flows?
Not sure if it has a name, unless there's a geological name for it. I'll do some research.
Sep
19
comment Have I got a little story for you
I think it's to add emphasis to what I am going to say; the emphasis, of course, being on the I.