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Aug
13
answered Words that can be repeated and still make sense
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
@Johathan Leffler - Actually, I have taken the paragraph out of its context. The sentence prior to this paragraph referred to a random selection of values between -n and n, hence the 'range' of values. Maybe I should have used 'smaller' or 'larger' range, instead.
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
@GEdgar (and others) - I take back what I said about your argument being the contrapositive. It is the inverse which, in fact, is the correct answer. Sorry about that - it's been a long day.... :-(
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
Thanks for that @Peter Shor. Like I noted in my reply to Hack Saw, I believe "inversely" is the more correct term to use but, just to be on the safe side, I have resorted to using "In Contrast..." as noted by Fraser. I definitely WON'T be using the term "Contrapositively..." LOL.
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
Thanks for that @Hack Saw. Although I do believe your suggestion of using the term "inversely" more accurately reflects what I want to describe, I think I will stick to "In contrast..." just to be on the safe side.
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
Thanks for that @Fraser Orr. I think I will stick to "In contrast..." just to be on the safe side.
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
Correction: @GEdgar - no disrespect but, the explanation you give as to the meaning of "converse" is actually the "contrapositive". I only just realised that when I read your reply again. I think I may stick to "In contrast..." or "On the other hand..." as suggested below.
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
Thanks @GEdgar, I wasn't certain whether "conversely" was appropriate in this case. You more or less confirmed it in my mind.
Aug
13
awarded  Student
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
Hi @simchona, (I believe) the reason why "conversely" won't work here is because in mathematical speak, the converse of a statement A implies B, is B implies A. In the example that I have provided above, I have more or less negated the statement. I could, however, be wrong.
Aug
13
asked Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
Aug
12
awarded  Editor