777 reputation
49
bio website
location Nowra, NSW, Australia
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 17 hours ago

Bill has just completed his Masters by Research in Computer Science and Software Engineering at the University of Wollongong. His research topic was in Lattice Based Cryptography.

Bill is currently working as a sub-contractor for small companies and organisations developing desktop and/or web-based applications.


Aug
28
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
14
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
10
awarded  Yearling
Jun
20
awarded  Caucus
Jan
27
comment Difference between the terms 'famous' & 'infamous'; 'valuable' & 'invaluable'
@PeterShor - Thanks for that Peter. That is probably closer to the answer I was looking for.
Jan
27
comment Difference between the terms 'famous' & 'infamous'; 'valuable' & 'invaluable'
I understand the Latin meaning of the 'in-' prefix meaning not, and I suppose to a certain degree it is correctly used to describe the difference between the terms 'famous' versus 'infamous'. I was simply using 'valuable' and 'invaluable' to describe a situation where it is not used in this context.
Jan
27
asked Difference between the terms 'famous' & 'infamous'; 'valuable' & 'invaluable'
Aug
10
awarded  Yearling
Aug
10
awarded  Yearling
Oct
6
comment Choice of words referring to being attacked/assaulted with a glass/cup
That's a fair point regarding the word shanking, however, as I wouldn't expect to be penetrated by a coffee mug as I would a glass vessel/container, or a makeshift weapon for that matter, I was thinking along the lines of an act/offense that would cause blunt trauma.
Oct
6
asked Choice of words referring to being attacked/assaulted with a glass/cup
Oct
6
comment Why does “air conditioning” always mean “cooling” and never “heating”?
Seriously, though, I had a similar understanding of the expression 'air conditioning' to mean cooling, as opposed to heating, whilst living in Victoria, Australia. It was not until I moved to NSW that I heard the expression being used for both. I suppose the meaning differs depending on where you live....
Oct
6
awarded  Enthusiast
Oct
5
comment What phrase is less idiomatic than “softball question”?
@RobertCartaino - Glad I could help then. Just be careful, as some rhetorical questions may be considered hypothetical. Depends what you are asking though. Personally, I would use the expression blatantly obvious to describe the type of questions being asked by reporters (above) but, this too may be considered a cliche or idiomatic in nature.
Oct
5
comment What phrase is less idiomatic than “softball question”?
P.S. There's also the closed question, which which has a restricted range of answers, typically yes or no. Not sure if this is what you are after.
Oct
5
comment What phrase is less idiomatic than “softball question”?
There's the rhetorical question that (typically) does not require an answer because the answer is obvious and doesn't need to be stated. However, rhetorical questions can also be intended as a challenge, with the implication that the question is difficult or impossible to answer. Either way, I don't think this is the answer you are after. Can't blame a man for trying, though? ;-)
Oct
2
awarded  Scholar
Oct
2
accepted Meaning of Lyrics in “Diamonds on the Inside”
Oct
2
comment Meaning of Lyrics in “Diamonds on the Inside”
Good point! I never thought of it that way. I want to see if other people of this community share the same opinion before accepting this as the correct answer.
Oct
2
asked Meaning of Lyrics in “Diamonds on the Inside”