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seen May 14 at 22:01

Jul
8
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
1
awarded  Famous Question
Jun
21
comment Where and why were capital letters first used in headlines?
@Avner Shahar-Kashtan - In newspaper headlines, it's generally referred to as "upstyle," not title case. It's up to the paper's style guide; some papers use "upstyle" (In Which Most Words are Capitalized), some use "downstyle" (In which only the first word, or Proper Nouns, are capitalized).
May
30
comment Is there a word to describe the organisation of cells?
I think we used "complexity" when I was in school, but I can't remember for sure.
Nov
7
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
10
awarded  Yearling
Jul
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
8
comment Etymology of the expression “make a larry”, i.e. turn left
"Hang a Ulysses" is funny - in California (and I'm sure other places), we say "flip a bitch" for make a u-turn.
Sep
27
comment What's an idiom for doing something in an unnecessarily complicated way?
It doesn't answer your question, but I've always liked the abbreviation "K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple, Stupid."
Sep
27
comment What's an idiom for doing something in an unnecessarily complicated way?
Or in American English, "ass-backward".
Aug
29
comment Changing a quotation so that the original is recognised, but has been given a new meaning
It was from a advertisement put out by a coalition of dairy producers. However, it doesn't matter if the quote is attributed to a specific person or not, a "trope" is more generalized than that. I will however say that the one weakness in my answer is that the word I suggested, "trope" refers to the quote being modified, not the act of creating variations on the original. As far as I know, there's no verb form of trope. Tropetize? We could coin it right here on Stack.
Aug
28
answered What's wrong with 'caught no mice'?
Aug
28
answered Changing a quotation so that the original is recognised, but has been given a new meaning
Aug
25
comment Hyphenation in compound adjectives
Not exactly. Boiling hot is an adjective-adjective compound, whereas bike friendly is a noun-adjective compound. And since the need for a hyphen is subjective, I guess my real question (if it requires further clarification) is, "Is this sentence clear enough as written to do away with the hyphen?"
Aug
25
asked Hyphenation in compound adjectives
Aug
25
awarded  Critic
Aug
25
awarded  Commentator
Aug
25
answered Error on wiki page - Is it ok?
Aug
18
comment Correct use of “circa”
@Thursagen - I used the correct word for what I meant, for two reasons: 1.) Obfuscated implies that something is made intentionally confusing. Simply saying something is "confusing" does not imply whether it was intentional or not. 2.) It was also partially for the ironic satisfaction of using an uncommon word in a post about my hatred of people who use unnecessarily obtuse language when simpler language will suffice. - "Eschew obfuscation, espouse elucidation."
Aug
18
awarded  Editor