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 Yearling
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Nov
15
answered Big Picture vs Long run vs Long Term
Nov
15
answered Proper grammatical usage of 'had' vs 'having'
Nov
15
comment Proper grammatical usage of 'had' vs 'having'
That assumes that the two facts are the reason, but it may be that the second fact follows from the first, in which case "had" would be more appropriate. I would argue that the scenario I present is more common.
Nov
15
comment Source of 'BB' in the sense of 'small, spherical pellet of shot'
This, pp 116-120, implies the scale that includes "BB" may have been invented by a committee of the New York State Sportsmen's Convention at Niagara Falls. Date unspecified, but certainly prior to the book's copyright of 1879.
Nov
15
comment Source of 'BB' in the sense of 'small, spherical pellet of shot'
I just want to point out that the "OO" in your quoted text should be "00". That is, they should be zeroes, not capital "oh"s. That is part of the numerical system and probably shouldn't be included along with "BB", "FF", and "TT" in your etymology searchings.
Nov
15
answered What do you call a person who “shuts down” ideas?
Nov
15
answered How do you feel about the use of the first indefinite article in: “A computer is a very useful tool”?
Oct
11
accepted “Hot mess” meaning and etymology
Oct
11
comment “Hot mess” meaning and etymology
FWIW, hot mess was added to OxfordDictionaries.com in August 2014 with the definition "n.: (US informal) a person or thing that is spectacularly unsuccessful or disordered"
Aug
9
awarded  Yearling
Jul
31
comment Abbreviation for “or the rest” (or “or others”)?
Or possibly "vel cetera"?
Jul
31
answered Abbreviation for “or the rest” (or “or others”)?
Jul
9
answered “in” vs “on” vs “at” with “rarely used code paths”
Jan
21
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
19
comment Is this an example of a dangling modifier?
I would be inclined to say that "finding (a person)" and "studying history" are both active endeavors that a single person is unlikely to pursue at the same time, making the sentence less ambiguous than if "found" were "met" or "stumbled into", or some other more passive activity. (And, to be clear, I'm not talking about active/passive in the grammatical sense.)
Dec
24
comment the good guys and the bad guys
@Barmar: protagonist and antagonist refer to the characters' roles in the narrative, not to positive and negative action. A common counterexample is Macbeth, where it's easy to see Macbeth, the protagonist, as the villain. (There are other more clear-cut examples, though.)
Dec
24
answered Mutually exclusive and not mutually exclusive
Dec
24
comment Plural adjective not followed by noun
I have absolutely no idea what that greyed out box is for or what information it's trying to convey.
Dec
23
revised Plural adjective not followed by noun
added 256 characters in body
Dec
23
comment Plural adjective not followed by noun
First, English does not have plural adjectives, or any sort of declension of adjectives. Second, it is not being used in your sentence as an adjective, but as a noun. That said, while "phonetics" can refer to the science specifically, Merriam-Webster also defines it as "the system of speech sounds of a language".