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visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Jan 4 '12 at 10:35

Aug
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
7
comment Plural of “copula”, does “copulas” or “copulae” sound more professional?
Search on Google Scholar? Or Google Books?
Nov
27
comment Plural of “copula”, does “copulas” or “copulae” sound more professional?
Yes, exactly. Being a learner of English doesn't mean you're not an expert in sheep, it simply means you've done your study in another language. In either case, "copulas" and "copulae" are both accepted, and I would hope that linguists (of all people) would turn a blind eye to your using their less favourite plural. Both exist and will be understood and are fine. If you want to ask the question "which is most accepted?", then a Google search is what you want, surely?
Nov
25
comment Word meaning “before sleeping”
Strange: "presomnolent" sounds syntactically much more sensible to me. Oh well.
Nov
25
comment Where should I place the adverb?
This. Number 1 also sounds possible to me, though somewhat informal; number 2 doesn't work, though it wouldn't sound like a mistake in speech if intoned correctly, just a bit sloppy.
Nov
25
comment Plural of “copula”, does “copulas” or “copulae” sound more professional?
This question strikes me as odd: I don't understand how the choice of a plural can sound "professional". If someone said "sheeps" or "cactuses", I certainly wouldn't think they were unprofessional.
Oct
13
comment Correct way to say “km^2”
@David: I have always understood a block 10 kilometres on each side to be "10 kilometres square", not squared. Reading "km^2" as "kilometres squared" is not uncommon (though this perhaps doesn't make it right, and in careful speech I would say "square kilometres").
Sep
30
comment Should “Project Manager” be capitalized?
@onomatomaniak: No, but you would probably punctuate it "I'm going fishing with Teacher tomorrow" (if you'd say that at all, of course!). This is what Lee said.
Sep
30
answered Can ‘them’ be used for ‘their’ in front of a noun?
Sep
28
comment Why does there exist a difference in spelling between British English and American English?
Actually, the original Latin spellings were color, honor, etc. I suspect the answer is simply that the two dialects grew up geographically far apart and without all that much intercommunication!
Sep
24
answered “In that case” vs “in this case”
Sep
20
awarded  Commentator
Sep
20
comment What do you call oxidized fruit?
I was just checking you hadn't made a typo. I've never heard "get brown". It sounds odd to my ears.
Sep
20
comment What do you call oxidized fruit?
I understand "go brown", but "get brown"?
Sep
19
awarded  Critic
Sep
18
comment What is the meaning of 'this is not here'?
This doesn't mean anything as it stands. But consider interpreting the sense more broadly: it could mean something like "this might as well not be here" (e.g. the door exists, but does not fulfil its purpose), or "this is not real" (e.g. the door seems to signify something which isn't really true or doesn't really exist). Incidentally, "This Is Not Here" is an exhibit of Yoko Ono.
Sep
17
comment What's the difference between “I am busy right now” and “I am busy at the moment”?
@Brian: Ah yes, I don't think I'd ever say it, but that definitely works. Thanks. :)
Sep
17
comment A word for “I am here!”
@Braveyard: I have no idea what the phrase in your question is supposed to mean! If you can give me some idea of what 'say "I am here"' means, I can try to tell you whether "stand out" is an appropriate substitute for it.
Sep
17
comment A word for “I am here!”
@Braveyard: Okay, I now understand that you are trying to replace the phrase 'say "I am here"' in your quotation. But I can't really guess at what sort of thing you're trying to replace it by. I don't know what it means for a company name to say "I am here". That doesn't mean anything in my mind, I'm afraid.
Sep
17
answered “Know your customers' needs before they even…” - “talk” or “speak”?