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seen Nov 2 '12 at 18:55

Feb
24
comment How do hyphens modify the meaning of “n-month-old”?
No matter how you phrase it it seems like you are asking if there is a difference in meaning between the three different examples of usage. My answer was no, as is slim's more verbose version apparently. I'm not really sure what the issue is, other than replying with a yes/no makes less sense when the question is subsequently edited to a "how does" which played more directly into what slim wanted to respond with.
Feb
24
comment How do hyphens modify the meaning of “n-month-old”?
heh, well if you remove the question he's asking and replace it with your own that changes things of course
Feb
24
comment How do hyphens modify the meaning of “n-month-old”?
@slim but he's asking if there is a difference in meaning, there is not
Nov
12
comment Word for a yes/no question that's more to elicit a longer response
@FumbleFingers Hahaha, that makes it all worthwhile! Also if someone puts middle-ended down for the answer I'll accept it, even though its part of SE culture I can't bring myself to answer my own question.
Nov
11
comment Word for a yes/no question that's more to elicit a longer response
@FumbleFingers middle-ended question is really a perfect description, might have to just make up a word. Essentially its an open-ended question disguised as a close-ended question.
Nov
11
comment Word for a yes/no question that's more to elicit a longer response
@Matt "Do you feel remorse for your affiliations with the Nazi party?"...although it doesn't have to be a loaded question, just something which you are reasonably sure is going to get the responder talking beyond the y/n
Nov
11
comment Word for a yes/no question that's more to elicit a longer response
@N.N. I'm asking how to describe a question that would elicit a more open-ended response even thought it could be answered y/n...not how to get someone to answer y/n
Oct
29
comment What word would you use to describe someone who tries to one up everything you say?
"that guy"...don't be that guy ;)
Oct
24
comment Meaning and usage of “hit the nail upon the top”
That looks like an incorrect translation of the idiom "hit the nail on the head" which means to get something exactly right.
Oct
23
comment Meaning of “Monkey still working let Baboon wait small”
"let baboon wait small" isn't even grammatically correct, I have no idea what she's saying there.
Oct
17
comment Should there be a comma in “Tell <name> <other name> says hi.”?
@FumbleFingers didn't realize you'd already said the same exact thing in the comments, if you want to answer down here and claim your sweet, sweet rep points I'll delete this answer.
Sep
8
comment “Keys to car” or “keys of car”
I'd be interested to know how much of the "key(s) of" results are actually in the context of music.
Aug
26
comment Some sentences in the beginning of movie “Forrest Gump”
@Mitch "leans away from the prescriptive" how ironic
Aug
25
comment What are the correct titles for the attendee/guest relationship?
"host" was the first thing that sprang to mine for me as well, but that seems wrong. Realistically you'd say "my date" (even if its platonic) but that's ignoring the context you're trying to explore.
Aug
25
comment Some sentences in the beginning of movie “Forrest Gump”
@Mitch Yeah, I'm from the south where people talk like that all the time, but not in English class, where they get called out for their bad grammar. I guess if you're going with the "nothing is bad grammar since anything that's ever been uttered is dialect" argument, that's pretty tough to argue against though.
Aug
25
comment Some sentences in the beginning of movie “Forrest Gump”
@Mitch "they was my magic shoes" is a grammatical error, dialect or no. As far as lack of intelligence, I thought I was clear in that we are speaking of a perception. You can argue that the perception doesn't exist I guess, but I can't imagine many people who have lived in the US for the last 40+ years or so will agree with you.
Aug
17
comment How did kool-aid come to be the drink of fanboys?
Yep, Jonestown reference.
Jul
29
comment What might “knock me over with a feather” mean?
Anything can be used sarcastically to indicate the opposite, that's what sarcasm means.
Jul
29
comment What is meant by “a carriage that returns”?
good lord, I remember the pain in my fingers from typing on these beasts in highschool...typing 'a' was like lifting pinky weights