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21221
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location Cambridge, United Kingdom
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visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Nov 25 '11 at 22:06

I'm an interaction designer and web developer working in bioinformatics.

I have a background in human-computer interaction, genetics, computer science, economics and modern languages.


Jan
24
comment Which one is more appropriate to use: “send you” or “send to you”?
I agree with Andy F. My wife grew up in northern England and says, for example, "I'll give it you" rather than "I'll give it to you", which is standard usage in southern England.
Jan
21
comment What's the term for flickering eye movement
Saccades are important for understanding scanpaths in eye-tracking studies, a technique widely used in human-computer interaction research and increasingly in commercial user experience evaluations (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_tracking#History)
Jan
7
comment Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?
@Jasper: yes, good point. +1.
Jan
5
comment “Taiwan visa” or “Taiwanese visa”?
OK, consider this: I call my travel agent to book a flight to Taipei, and I ask "Do I need a visa for Taiwan?". That sounds natural enough to me.
Jan
4
comment What is the origin of the 'do' construction?
In Ireland you also hear "do" + verb for habitual actions. For example, "I do go there on a Friday" means "I usually go there on Fridays".
Jan
1
comment Meaning of “yet” in “the best is yet to come”
Another way of saying this is "you ain't seen nothing yet".
Dec
20
comment Why did English become a universal language and when?
I've turned this into a question: english.stackexchange.com/questions/7146
Nov
3
comment History/connection/origin of using names as verbs/nouns?
... so "repéter" means "to fart again". Repéter et écouter. Nice.
Oct
21
comment What punctuation is this sentence missing?
"A large donkey-error America" -- I like it, Ophiuroid :-)
Oct
6
comment How do you greet multiple recipients in an e-mail?
I begin informal emails to multiple recipients with "Comrades". Maybe it's a Cold War nostalgia thing :-)
Oct
6
comment Is there a difference between “eatable” and “edible”?
Thanks for the credit :-)
Oct
5
comment Why Isn't Citizen 'Citisen' in British English?
I went to an English restaurant and had ghoti and chips. alphadictionary.com/articles/ling006.html
Sep
24
comment Is it acceptable to use “is become” instead of “has become”?
This reminds me of Robert Oppenheimer's quote: We knew the world would not be the same. Few people laughed, few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another. en.wikiquote.org/wiki
Sep
22
comment Plural of an initialism that ends with the letter S
Doh! Sorry, you're right. I've removed the link from my post.
Sep
22
comment What is the best salutation to use in cover letter when I don't have contact information?
I was taught a simple way to remember this at school: "never two Ss together". That is, if you start with "Dear Sir" then you never write "Yours sincerely" (note the S in Sir and sincerely), but instead write "Yours faithfully". When you write "Dear Mr Smith" you use "Yours faithfully" and not "Yours sincerely".
Sep
17
comment What is the origin of “Couldn't hit a cow's arse with a banjo”?
I just found a better way of searching Google by date range -- you get a nice visualisation of the data too: google.co.uk/…
Sep
16
comment What is the origin of “Couldn't hit a cow's arse with a banjo”?
@RegDwight: Thanks for updating the links.
Sep
16
comment What is the origin of “Couldn't hit a cow's arse with a banjo”?
P.S. StackExchange seems to have problems with links containing apostrophes
Sep
15
comment Do most languages need more space than English?
Great answer. Thank you.
Sep
14
comment When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑s”?
Good answers. It shows that you shouldn't believe everything your teacher tells you.