2,934 reputation
21019
bio website
location Cambridge, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Nov 25 '11 at 22:06

I'm an interaction designer and web developer working in bioinformatics.

I have a background in human-computer interaction, genetics, computer science, economics and modern languages.


Jan
7
comment Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?
@Jasper: yes, good point. +1.
Jan
5
comment “Taiwan visa” or “Taiwanese visa”?
OK, consider this: I call my travel agent to book a flight to Taipei, and I ask "Do I need a visa for Taiwan?". That sounds natural enough to me.
Jan
4
comment What is the origin of the 'do' construction?
In Ireland you also hear "do" + verb for habitual actions. For example, "I do go there on a Friday" means "I usually go there on Fridays".
Jan
1
revised Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?
added 256 characters in body; deleted 6 characters in body
Jan
1
comment Meaning of “yet” in “the best is yet to come”
Another way of saying this is "you ain't seen nothing yet".
Jan
1
answered Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?
Jan
1
answered High School learning address
Dec
26
answered “Taiwan visa” or “Taiwanese visa”?
Dec
21
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
21
revised Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?
added 62 characters in body
Dec
21
answered Pairs in common idioms/phrases
Dec
21
answered Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?
Dec
20
comment Why did English become a universal language and when?
I've turned this into a question: english.stackexchange.com/questions/7146
Dec
20
asked What is the future of English as a lingua franca?
Dec
20
answered Why did English become a universal language and when?
Dec
18
revised What are the most common tense mistakes made in English?
Re-ordered sentence to make clearer following RegDwight's comments.; added 4 characters in body
Dec
17
answered What are the most common tense mistakes made in English?
Dec
13
answered Idiom for saying “You are making someone go mad/angry.”
Nov
3
comment History/connection/origin of using names as verbs/nouns?
... so "repéter" means "to fart again". Repéter et écouter. Nice.