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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen May 24 '12 at 20:55

Aug
27
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
29
awarded  Yearling
May
24
awarded  Scholar
May
24
accepted What do you call moving a word to change a sentence's meaning?
Dec
21
answered What is the exact meaning of the following sentence?
Dec
21
awarded  Student
Dec
21
asked What do you call moving a word to change a sentence's meaning?
Dec
21
asked What's a very long prosodic stress example?
Sep
10
comment What's a better word than “colon-ized” or “title-rrhea” for this style in book titles?
The question's regarding style, whether or not there's a trend. However, browsing stores nowadays definitely gives me the impression there's more title-rrhea now than 10 + 20 years ago (not sure what it was like in 1847 or 1886). The archived bestseller lists usually don't make clear what are descriptions + what are subtitles, so quantifying any trend isn't easy. In any case, stuff like "I, Sniper: A Bob Lee Swagger Novel (Bob Lee Swagger Novels)" is definitely excessive/irritating. For any book with TITLE:SUBTITLE, I find TITLE or SUBTITLE (if not too long) alone would usually be sufficient.
Sep
10
comment What's a better word than “colon-ized” or “title-rrhea” for this style in book titles?
The question was not just that a subtitle is used, but used in an excessive/irritating fashion.
Sep
10
revised What's a better word than “colon-ized” or “title-rrhea” for this style in book titles?
edited title
Sep
9
revised What's a better word than “colon-ized” or “title-rrhea” for this style in book titles?
edited title
Sep
9
awarded  Editor
Sep
9
revised What's a better word than “colon-ized” or “title-rrhea” for this style in book titles?
added 69 characters in body
Sep
9
asked What's a better word than “colon-ized” or “title-rrhea” for this style in book titles?
Jul
29
answered Can “daisy chain” be a verb?
Jul
29
comment Origin and status of “hosed”, meaning “broken”
Then what is "ngrams.googlelabs.com shows frequency of use of 'hosed' tripling between 1930 and 1940" using as data?
Jul
29
awarded  Teacher
Jul
29
answered Origin and status of “hosed”, meaning “broken”