50,207 reputation
556134
bio website yume3.sourceforge.net
location MT
age 93
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 35 mins ago

Former pictures: Dakota puddles (prairie potholes), 2012-01-30; Yellowstone River icicles, 12 Dec 2011; Black-and-white ducks on YR, ca 6 Jan 2012; Eagle in eastwind snow, on south bank of YR, 15 Jan 2012; Sunlight & shadows on riverbottom, 5 Feb 2012; Duck in park puddle, June 2011; Trumpeter swan pair on YR, 13 Feb 2012; American Avocet on YR, 10 May 2012; Pelicans flying above YR, 24 June 2012, and pelican in YR, 16 May 2012; Rainbow above Livingston Peak, 23 July 2012; Rose/squirrel, 21 Nov 2012; old Bangalore station, Dec 2004; Bighorn sheep, Zion, 8 Nov 2013

Author of programs yume as seen here and qenqote as described here

qenqote automates URL-formatting editing and can minimize the amount of manual editing needed when you include a URL in a stackexchange post.


1h
comment What is the part of speech for words suffixed with “ity”?
“is it the plural” between commas looks like a typo. (Missing question mark. :)
6h
comment Connotation of “appease”
How do you get the concept of an insulted party in that sentence?
6h
comment a single decisive word for a “positive result”
In my reading of the two phrases, “fruits and repercussions” refers to the whole phrase “prevalence of technology”; “benefits and drawbacks” does not, but only to prevalence itself. That is, the former emphasizes technology as the subject, while the latter does not.
7h
comment picking a nicer word than article
Yeah, I don't like words like atricle either.
12h
comment Can a person happen? Is “Zodanga happened” correct?
@Kris, but perhaps you are thinking of a different Silvia.
12h
comment What would be a valid replacement of “as”?
You seem to be using punctive to mean at a point in time, vs its OED1 def., “Making straight for a point”. Note, onelook and wordnet don't find punctive in the several dozen dictionaries they search.
2d
comment Might the use of the word “where” be inapt in these three sentences?
The last sentence seemed to say whereby would work
Jul
21
comment Might the use of the word “where” be inapt in these three sentences?
See wiktionary's whereby “Usage notes”: “Use of whereby as a formal equivalent of where is nonstandard and is avoided by careful speakers and writers, who use where or in which instead. The term typically fails readability and comprehension review so it is generally avoided in published works.” -1
Jul
21
comment what does “early next week” means when said on Sunday?
Also see "Until next week",
Jul
19
comment Pronunciation problem
You may find English Language Learners useful, although your question may be off-topic there as well as here.
Jul
19
comment “help someone convince” vs “help someone to be convinced”?
You may find English Language Learners useful.
Jul
17
comment Specific word used for the combining of past and current experience
recidivism?
Jul
16
comment Positive alternative to “ominous”
I think portentous is of neutral connotation, but wiktionary may suggest otherwise: “Of momentous or ominous significance. ... Ominously prophetic.”
Jul
16
comment A critical situation in which no trick works?
I mentioned a foregone conclusion in my answer earlier in the day
Jul
16
comment A critical situation in which no trick works?
That's spelled dire straits, not straights. Also, Wiktionary says “A difficult position” rather than an impossible one.
Jul
15
comment A critical situation in which no trick works?
@Tonny, I was surprised that inevitable, inexorable, and some others of these hadn't been mentioned, when I posted. That was about half a day after the question was asked, and most views had already happened.
Jul
14
comment Being Clever vs Being Wise
Got any sources?
Jul
14
comment “Rejoice to hear it”
@shipr, there are numerous mid-1800's novels where “I rejoice to hear it” is offered as straight-up dialog; but from the early 1900's on, usually as irony or sarcasm.
Jul
14
comment Error in sentence - Incoherent relative clause?
Please cite source of quote
Jul
12
comment Is there a term for discrimination without negative connotation?
Actually, sloppiness is already pretty easy to do, without working on it more.