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Jul
10
comment What is the opposite of “preaching to the choir”?
@CalebBernard, regarding your first sentence, that is ok because the question as phrased is asking what the one who doesn't want to listen can say.
Jun
11
comment How should “midnight on…” be interpreted?
@chux, yes, of course; that's the usual nature of UTC times.
Apr
28
comment Passive of “tried to eat”
The two choices referred to are the phrases either side of or: (1) “The worms were tried to be eaten” or (2) “The worms were eaten attemptively”. In my answer I claimed the grammar of (1) is wrong (tried, standing as a predicative adjective, is not one). The grammar of (2) is ok, but it is clumsy and vague. “Eaten attemptively” may mean none, some, or all the worms got eaten, while original “tried to eat the worms” suggests few if any worms were eaten.
Apr
18
comment What is “embarrassing” about an embarrassingly parallel problem?
@snim2, it's true that embarrassingly parallel problems especially suit parallel execution, but not all well-suited problems are embarrassingly parallel. Typically, in E.P. problems (1) modes of parallelism are quite obvious, and (2) the granularity of available parallelism is quite fine, and for large problems, no matter how many processors are available, more processors could be used effectively. Problems where the useful number of processors is limited by communications, data, or history are less likely to be termed embarrassingly parallel.
Jan
8
comment “Attendant with” vs. “attendant to” vs. “attendant of”
Instead of “risks that are attendant with the operation of the product” I'd write “risks concomitant with operation of the product”. Note, attendant is among synonyms of concomitant.
Dec
27
comment Possessives & Compound Construction
Although I disagree with your third paragraph, and regard the second as unclear or misguided, the first seems true.
Dec
27
comment Possessives & Compound Construction
Oldbag, I think you've stated the obvious and sidestepped the main issues.
Dec
27
comment Possessives & Compound Construction
@EdwinAshworth, your first comment's example seems perfectly clear. It doesn't need rephrasing, although perhaps calls for an explanation of why the man took the dog's pocket watch.
Dec
23
comment A word for “look down on”
The question doesn't say whether the teacher's understanding of the value of her profession is wrong, ie does not provide any evidence to support your answer.
Dec
23
comment What is the difference between “submit” and “deposit”?
You may find English Language Learners useful.
Dec
23
comment Difference between “to think” and “think”
You may find English Language Learners useful.
Dec
19
comment What's a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”?
I've never heard of subscripted L's being used in that manner. On the other hand, superscripted L's like L¹ and L² are well-known and widely-used references to p-norms and Lᵖ spaces, with L¹ representing Manhattan measures and L² representing Euclidean measures.
Dec
19
comment What is a “plumber's wife”?
@FumbleFingers, perhaps you can give a link to the earlier question if it is relevant.
Dec
19
comment What is the word whose meaning is to “oversimplify a complex issue; often incorrectly?”
Also see linked questions What’s a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”? and A word for “to make something bland and boring”
Dec
19
comment Does “last July” refer to July 2013 or July 2014?
Also see links in John Lawler's answer to Meaning of “last/this/next Monday”,
Dec
16
comment Respective: Lines connect a circle and two respective squares
“This wording is impossible to misunderstand” is incorrect; I'm perfectly capable of misunderstanding the wording you give, several different ways, none of which coincide with my understanding of the scenario in the question.
Dec
14
comment that ideas which our minds cannot reconcile are mutually destructive, sillier still
The latter half of the last paragraph (your parenthesis) is consistent with the quoted bit, but the first half looks irrelevant to it. This part of the quote seems to say it is still more silly to think that if ideas are inconsistent with each other then they destroy each other.
Dec
13
comment I’m looking for a word or phrase that describes the feeling that something very bad or catastrophic is about to happen
@DaveMagner, Wiktionary suggests it's usually something negative; which in fact is a negative connotation. But perhaps it doesn't have a negative denotation.
Dec
12
comment What does “between” mean in this sentence?
Do you have a source for the quote? Or other context?
Dec
8
comment Use of “respectively” twice
@JanusBahsJacquet, I noticed a high percentage of non-Anglo names. I'm unwilling to conclude from that that most people using this expression are not native English speakers or that it entered the English language in that way. For one thing, many of the writers may have had native-English-speaker advisors. For another, I've seen the form used by many British and American authors. (I don't approve of the form, so it sticks out memorably when I do see it.) Note, Ernst Mayr edited the referenced volume; Wen-Lian Hsu was author of paper.