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Jun
11
comment How should “midnight on…” be interpreted?
@chux, yes, of course; that's the usual nature of UTC times.
May
20
awarded  Famous Question
May
7
revised Is there a good word for a square-rectangle relationship?
add subclass note
Apr
28
comment Passive of “tried to eat”
The two choices referred to are the phrases either side of or: (1) “The worms were tried to be eaten” or (2) “The worms were eaten attemptively”. In my answer I claimed the grammar of (1) is wrong (tried, standing as a predicative adjective, is not one). The grammar of (2) is ok, but it is clumsy and vague. “Eaten attemptively” may mean none, some, or all the worms got eaten, while original “tried to eat the worms” suggests few if any worms were eaten.
Apr
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
18
comment What is “embarrassing” about an embarrassingly parallel problem?
@snim2, it's true that embarrassingly parallel problems especially suit parallel execution, but not all well-suited problems are embarrassingly parallel. Typically, in E.P. problems (1) modes of parallelism are quite obvious, and (2) the granularity of available parallelism is quite fine, and for large problems, no matter how many processors are available, more processors could be used effectively. Problems where the useful number of processors is limited by communications, data, or history are less likely to be termed embarrassingly parallel.
Apr
11
awarded  grammar
Mar
22
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
27
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
20
accepted Origin of “as all get out” meaning “to the utmost degree”
Feb
1
answered a word that would mean “a marriage where either of the spouse is of a higher rank or caste”
Jan
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
8
comment “Attendant with” vs. “attendant to” vs. “attendant of”
Instead of “risks that are attendant with the operation of the product” I'd write “risks concomitant with operation of the product”. Note, attendant is among synonyms of concomitant.
Dec
27
comment Possessives & Compound Construction
Although I disagree with your third paragraph, and regard the second as unclear or misguided, the first seems true.
Dec
27
comment Possessives & Compound Construction
Oldbag, I think you've stated the obvious and sidestepped the main issues.
Dec
27
comment Possessives & Compound Construction
@EdwinAshworth, your first comment's example seems perfectly clear. It doesn't need rephrasing, although perhaps calls for an explanation of why the man took the dog's pocket watch.
Dec
27
answered You do not need to take further action/s. Action or actions?
Dec
23
comment A word for “look down on”
The question doesn't say whether the teacher's understanding of the value of her profession is wrong, ie does not provide any evidence to support your answer.