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location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
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Aug
20
comment Is “what on earth” still commonly used in real life? Is there any alternative that is not cursing or obscene?
"What the devil" should be in there, as well. I'm hoping to see a spike late 80s/early 90s ;)
Aug
20
comment Is “what on earth” still commonly used in real life? Is there any alternative that is not cursing or obscene?
So.. Anyone else also first think of Carmen Sandiego?
Aug
14
comment Dinky cars (toy cars)
@bib I think Kleenex is going that way, though. I (and many in the area I grew up) learned to use "kleenex" for all types of tissues. Ten years later, "tissue" still sounds odd to me.
Aug
14
comment Speak Slower or Speak Slowlier?
+1 - and as a native English speaker, I've also never heard "slowlier" before.
Aug
5
comment Is the word “throwee” acceptable?
@ŠimeVidas In Javascript, primitives are objects: z = 1; z.toString(), So "thrown object" is perfectly valid.
Jul
30
comment “Instable” or “unstable”?
Coming from a CS perspective, I've never heard of an "instable algorithm" before. "Unstable algorithms" (such as an "unstable sort") are common, though.
Jul
28
awarded  Yearling
Jul
12
comment How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
@octern Despite the dictionary definition, colloquial usage is from the perspective of the tenant. It's usually not considered ambiguous.
Jul
12
comment Can you really “See that thing in person”?
Third interpretation: Glasses or contact lenses that tint everything red ;)
Jul
12
comment How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
+1 for "renting out"
Jun
21
revised Difference between “the very first” and “first”
added 226 characters in body
Jun
21
comment Difference between “the very first” and “first”
@ColinFine Specific to the example objects/these two cases, or something else?
Jun
21
answered Difference between “the very first” and “first”
Jun
17
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
@ThePopMachine I fully agree about Chinese, but Math isn't a language. At best, it's a metalanguage that requires another language to be able to speak aloud. Introducing ambiguity by trying to convert it to language-based idioms by using words like "quantity" instead of specifying start-end ranges with "paren" and "close-paren" is one of the worst things you can do when communicating something as precise as math.
Jun
17
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
@ThePopMachine Besides, how exactly is "using English" not an "English language usage" answer?
Jun
17
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
@ThePopMachine See hkBattousai's answer for why this is probably the best: There is no standard, and no upper bound on complexity. You shouldn't be saying mathematical equations aloud, but saying each symbol will at least remove ambiguity.
Jun
15
comment What do brackets in a quote mean?
@MikeRamirez ...I am unfortunately uncertain if that's a joke, or a misunderstand of "school years" being up to age 17 and missing the final year of highschool, where I meant ages ~5 through ~22...
Jun
15
comment What do brackets in a quote mean?
Except that this particular part of "punctuation" has never been addressed in my 17 years of schooling. (Kindergarten through college graduation, in the US)
Jun
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
14
answered How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”