924 reputation
58
bio website
location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 16 hours ago

Jun
21
answered Difference between “the very first” and “first”
Jun
17
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
@ThePopMachine I fully agree about Chinese, but Math isn't a language. At best, it's a metalanguage that requires another language to be able to speak aloud. Introducing ambiguity by trying to convert it to language-based idioms by using words like "quantity" instead of specifying start-end ranges with "paren" and "close-paren" is one of the worst things you can do when communicating something as precise as math.
Jun
17
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
@ThePopMachine Besides, how exactly is "using English" not an "English language usage" answer?
Jun
17
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
@ThePopMachine See hkBattousai's answer for why this is probably the best: There is no standard, and no upper bound on complexity. You shouldn't be saying mathematical equations aloud, but saying each symbol will at least remove ambiguity.
Jun
15
comment What do brackets in a quote mean?
@MikeRamirez ...I am unfortunately uncertain if that's a joke, or a misunderstand of "school years" being up to age 17 and missing the final year of highschool, where I meant ages ~5 through ~22...
Jun
15
comment What do brackets in a quote mean?
Except that this particular part of "punctuation" has never been addressed in my 17 years of schooling. (Kindergarten through college graduation, in the US)
Jun
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
14
answered How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
Jun
7
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
@Mitch The usage here is as an intransitive verb.
Jun
6
answered What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
Jun
6
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
"Collapse" is the version "buckled" that immediately pops into mind for me - it's not a good choice if you want others to easily distinguish the collapsing vs non-collapsing type of "buckling".
Jun
4
comment Word for student's notebook
@MarkBeadles The time era I'm thinking of was ~1996-97 in Illinois, and I don't recall anything for the "good or bad behavior" usage beyond 4th grade (age 10, ~1998-1999 for me). As for homework, we just do them in "notebooks". =)
Jun
4
comment Word for student's notebook
@MarkBeadles What grade level? The only thing I can think of in the US was a part of our report card back in early gradeschool (around 8 years old)
Jun
1
comment Announcing married couple
Additionally, including the husband's name like that is unusual and unnatural enough for me that I have to actually think about it for a minute every time it happens - my natural reaction is to think we're being told the wife's name.
Jun
1
comment Announcing married couple
+1 for taking offense.
May
27
comment Polite alternatives to “as soon as possible”
@Albertus This is why Shyam's answer is right - it puts the focus on the person asking you to hurry, rather than the one being asked to hurry. Much more polite.
May
27
comment Polite alternatives to “as soon as possible”
@Albertus It means that the asker is expecting the person they're asking will take a while to get to the task at hand, despite its urgency, because it's happened before - and implies incompetence on that person's part.
May
27
comment Polite alternatives to “as soon as possible”
I also read this as condescending...
May
17
answered Alternatives to “Good Night” when sleeping in the afternoon
May
11
comment Should “glamourous” be considered incorrect?
Oddly enough, "glamourous" is what I would default to here in the US. Although spellcheck has it underlined right now, so I'd probably change it, as I have no strong feelings either way.