914 reputation
48
bio website
location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Apr 16 at 18:23

Jun
4
comment Word for student's notebook
@MarkBeadles The time era I'm thinking of was ~1996-97 in Illinois, and I don't recall anything for the "good or bad behavior" usage beyond 4th grade (age 10, ~1998-1999 for me). As for homework, we just do them in "notebooks". =)
Jun
4
comment Word for student's notebook
@MarkBeadles What grade level? The only thing I can think of in the US was a part of our report card back in early gradeschool (around 8 years old)
Jun
1
comment Announcing married couple
Additionally, including the husband's name like that is unusual and unnatural enough for me that I have to actually think about it for a minute every time it happens - my natural reaction is to think we're being told the wife's name.
Jun
1
comment Announcing married couple
+1 for taking offense.
May
27
comment Polite alternatives to “as soon as possible”
@Albertus This is why Shyam's answer is right - it puts the focus on the person asking you to hurry, rather than the one being asked to hurry. Much more polite.
May
27
comment Polite alternatives to “as soon as possible”
@Albertus It means that the asker is expecting the person they're asking will take a while to get to the task at hand, despite its urgency, because it's happened before - and implies incompetence on that person's part.
May
27
comment Polite alternatives to “as soon as possible”
I also read this as condescending...
May
17
answered Alternatives to “Good Night” when sleeping in the afternoon
May
15
comment Is it wrong to use “never” for a specific time period?
@Kanini Depends on... intonation? (not sure what the right word is) It can be said either way: never be (created or destroyed) or never (be created) nor (be destroyed). Note the lack of a second "be" when using "or".
May
15
comment Is it wrong to use “never” for a specific time period?
Actually, it would be "scrum meetings". "Scrums" is borderline gibberish, since "scrum" is a methodology and not something you can have many of.
May
11
comment Should “glamourous” be considered incorrect?
Oddly enough, "glamourous" is what I would default to here in the US. Although spellcheck has it underlined right now, so I'd probably change it, as I have no strong feelings either way.
May
9
comment Is “haphazard” a unique word?
I pronounce it like "Haff-hazard"...
Apr
18
comment Opposite of 'Midas touch'?
@FumbleFingers I have to agree with Monica's comment - I always thought the term originated with film noir. I never new it related to anything biblical.
Apr
16
comment Is “Yankee” derogatory?
+1 because I live in the north and find both "Yank" and "Yankee" offensive.
Apr
16
comment Clarion call vs rallying cry
a clarion call would be aimed at people who don't agree with a position yet ...Nice, that even explains the usage of the term in an episode of Grimm.
Apr
11
answered Plural of “advice”
Apr
11
comment Plural of “advice”
+1 because he's coming from a CS/programming perspective, and this is the only one that makes sense. You'd likewise talk about car objects, house objects, and so on.
Mar
9
comment “Super-duper ultra mega”
@Mitch I'd put it like neil says, except not between "huge" and "dome". Stringing all the adjectives together gives it a slight monotone, and emphasizes all of them.
Mar
7
comment Is there a word that means both opening and closing a door?
@smackfu Or has a technical background. I can see it getting some laughs in our IT department (and everyone would understand it).
Mar
7
comment Is there a word that means both opening and closing a door?
@Robusto If the door was already open, "Please do not use..." would mean, please do not walk through it. It's basically asking for someone else be helpful and close it.