924 reputation
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location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
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Apr
19
comment If the plural of ‘man’ is ‘men,’ shouldn’t the plural of ‘German’ be ‘Germen’?
Check out the Chaos poem; English is more frelled than that! (Granted, it's more about pronunciation than pluralization; I think it still makes my point ^_^)
Apr
3
comment What is the difference between “Gay” and “Homosexual"? Is it only by gender?
@JoeZeng There's another that's something like 10 letters long (I know it includes I for "intersex"), but yeah, LGBT concise and easily remembered/recognized and so probably the most often used when trying to be incusive.
Apr
3
comment What is the difference between “Gay” and “Homosexual"? Is it only by gender?
@StoneyB I'm gay, and I use "gay". I dislike "homosexual" because it sounds far too clinical/scientific. Edit note after reading answers: Basically, what Cerberus described (since I'm on the younger side, at 24 years)
Mar
18
comment Is it derogatory or offensive to call a detective a dick?
@KristinaLopez "Wow! You dicks are always trying to get to the bottom of a mystery, aren't you?" - Not necessarily. In that case, most people would probably take it as a sarcastic "You idiots are always...", with an implied "and failing".
Mar
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
5
comment Why is a “splash screen” so called?
Rather than water, think of an artist "splashing" a paint bucket over a canvas.
Mar
1
comment Derogatory term for electronic device
Gizmo? Mogwai! (So, I wouldn't usually use it as you suggest. Although I agree it is valid)
Feb
26
comment Why do programmers always use 'we' when really they mean 'me' or 'you'?
+1, pretty much the same for me. "You" is too easily accusative, and "I" is too easily arrogant (even when we don't intend it as such). "We" is a good middle ground - and in a professional setting, is often the only correct term, when multiple people work on the same piece of code.
Feb
18
answered What number bus is that? or What bus number is that?
Feb
18
comment What number bus is that? or What bus number is that?
@AlvinWong I'd omit "number" entirely. I don't care about the bus's unique identifier; I care that it's going to go the route I want to take. "Which route is that [bus]?". Or, because no one cares about the bus's unique identifier when they're waiting for the bus, "Which bus is that?" also implies route number. I have no idea why anyone is considering the bus's unique identification number as a possible answer...
Feb
14
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
@FumbleFingers If you're looking for the origin of the usage, the question should say so.
Feb
14
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
@FumbleFingers From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Soft water) Water softening is the removal of calcium, magnesium, and certain other metal cations in hard water. The resulting soft water is more compatible with soap and extends the lifetime of plumbing. Water softening is usually achieved using ion-exchange resins. - Okay, so not strictly minerals - the more metallic ones are exchanged for others. Still, this question is easily answerable on Wikipedia, and IIRC this site still has General Reference, doesn't it?
Feb
13
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
@tchrist "Why is hard water called 'hard water'?" "Because it has more minerals in it than soft water.". It completely answers "why is it called ___?" (with the exception of threshold, as mentioned in AndrewLeach's answer), and it isn't related to lather as mentioned in the question. That's a side-effect of there being more minerals in the water.
Feb
13
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
The very first sentence on Wikipedia says Hard water is water that has high mineral content (in contrast with "soft water")....
Feb
13
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
Or at least, not as much. But yes, I'm 99% sure that this is the simplest and most correct answer so far..
Feb
6
comment “Sound” is to “mute” as “visuals” is to what verb?
Oh, the other "mute". I was almost going to answer "blind".
Jan
23
comment Are there popular English sayings to express “Big fuss, tiny result”?
Hey, look, one I've heard before! +1 for the part of the Macbeth quote in the first quote block. It's close, at least.
Jan
16
comment “To shoot out of cannon into sparrows”
@LarsH To "make a mountain out of a molehill" is to imagine a problem as larger than it is. The question is about using a tool inappropriate (and sometimes overkill) for the job at hand. There's only a tiiiny bit of overlap - it's borderline unrelated.
Jan
16
comment “To shoot out of cannon into sparrows”
I've heard variations of this one tons of times in the US. Usually it's not written like this, though - it's more like "Hammer, meet peanut".
Jan
8
comment Meaning of “the seventies are calling”
'Twas a "dee-dee-dee-dee-deet" ringtone, very old sounding