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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 194 votes cast
Aug
16
comment Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex'
@StoneyB Unless "Saxon" means "coast" (does it?), I don't see how that's relevant to my joke/comment...
Aug
16
comment Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex'
There seems to be one missing... Is there a.. hmm.. "Nosex"? ;)
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
Medium for... Cars? Magic? Electricity? The ambiguity of this term (which will require a second qualifying word) seems to negate its usefulness with the intended meaning in the question.
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
@JackRyan I'm bringing it up because the question specifically asks about in the context of a programming problem, which sounds like a video game of some sort to me. When thought of that way, almost every other answer just sounds bizarre and (in one or two cases) pretentious - and in others, ambiguous ("domain", for example, is much more broad than makes sense - you'd need to qualify what it is the domain of, negating the advantage of the term).
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
@JackRyan Within the context of video games, "terrain" is used (almost everywhere) for surfaces the players can traverse, provided there are no other obstacles (like a wall or building). This includes land and, often, water (some games don't allow players in the water), although I'm not so sure about air/space.
Aug
5
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
+1 from me because I've actually heard this used in this way before, unlike the current top answer's "reappropriation" - which I've never heard in this context before. Probably, that's just too technical for everyday speech, while "co-opt" is short and to the point.
Aug
4
comment A word that means that when two elements are mixed they become stronger
A quick Google search away: etymonline.com/index.php?term=synergy - it was probably just left out of that dictionary
Aug
1
comment What is a term for the hierarchical relationship between parent and child configuration options in software?
To be precise, it recursively enables/disables all immediate children. Usually, "children" informally includes grandchildren (and etc), making "recursively" redundant, yet at the same time, slightly more accurate...
Jul
30
comment How can I spell out Pope Francis’s remark on gay priests, ‘Who am I to judge?’
+1 @Mitch for "People really don't use 'whom' anymore"... It sounds archaic/Old English-y
Jul
28
comment Is there another way of saying “less is more”?
@RegDwighт Because "less is more" is reminiscent of Ingsoc slogans from Nineteen Eighty-Four, while alternatives below are not. I for one have never liked the phrase.
Jul
28
awarded  Yearling
Jul
24
comment What is a “blow-off answer”?
@AndrewNg Including "off" means to complete the act in question, while not including it means they may or may not have finished the NSFW action.
Jul
24
comment What is a “blow-off answer”?
A note to non-fluent English speakers: "blowing someone off" has another NSFW meaning (that "blow-off answer" does not have), so be careful with how you phrase/search for it.
Jul
24
comment What is “Gatcha” short for?
@AgustiRoig Almost certainly, unless it's referring to Gatchaman
Jul
22
comment “All roads lead to Rome”
Not really; "All roads lead to Rome" is common enough (and the "All roads lead to" part of the construct uncommon enough) that "All roads lead to <very important part of whatever project you're working on>" will be understood in English. Just remember that it's used conceptually like that, and not as a physical location.
Jul
19
comment What is the best word for a place where programmers work?
"Shop" alone also makes me think of car mechanics.
Jun
28
comment Is it OK to use “empty-handed” on an animal?
@Mari-LouA I'd go with talons for that part of the anatomy, except they don't picks stuff up with them
Jun
25
comment Is there English counterpart(s) to Japanese old saying, “Present salt to your enemy.”?
I'm pretty sure that's still a figurative usage - "standing" there means "social standing", not "standing up"
Jun
23
comment What does “purchasers of a new tablet won’t ‘end up with a doorstop’” mean?
@NateEldredge Y'know, you could fix the grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Like rhetorician did. It's part of why anyone can edit answers on the StackExchange sites.
Jun
22
comment What does “purchasers of a new tablet won’t ‘end up with a doorstop’” mean?
Huh. I don't usually hear "doorstop" used like that. For the intended meaning, the word "paperweight" is more common, isn't it?