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location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 2 days ago

Feb
14
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
@FumbleFingers If you're looking for the origin of the usage, the question should say so.
Feb
14
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
@FumbleFingers From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Soft water) Water softening is the removal of calcium, magnesium, and certain other metal cations in hard water. The resulting soft water is more compatible with soap and extends the lifetime of plumbing. Water softening is usually achieved using ion-exchange resins. - Okay, so not strictly minerals - the more metallic ones are exchanged for others. Still, this question is easily answerable on Wikipedia, and IIRC this site still has General Reference, doesn't it?
Feb
13
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
@tchrist "Why is hard water called 'hard water'?" "Because it has more minerals in it than soft water.". It completely answers "why is it called ___?" (with the exception of threshold, as mentioned in AndrewLeach's answer), and it isn't related to lather as mentioned in the question. That's a side-effect of there being more minerals in the water.
Feb
13
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
The very first sentence on Wikipedia says Hard water is water that has high mineral content (in contrast with "soft water")....
Feb
13
comment Why is “hard water” and “soft water” so called?
Or at least, not as much. But yes, I'm 99% sure that this is the simplest and most correct answer so far..
Feb
6
comment “Sound” is to “mute” as “visuals” is to what verb?
Oh, the other "mute". I was almost going to answer "blind".
Jan
23
comment Are there popular English sayings to express “Big fuss, tiny result”?
Hey, look, one I've heard before! +1 for the part of the Macbeth quote in the first quote block. It's close, at least.
Jan
16
comment “To shoot out of cannon into sparrows”
@LarsH To "make a mountain out of a molehill" is to imagine a problem as larger than it is. The question is about using a tool inappropriate (and sometimes overkill) for the job at hand. There's only a tiiiny bit of overlap - it's borderline unrelated.
Jan
16
comment “To shoot out of cannon into sparrows”
I've heard variations of this one tons of times in the US. Usually it's not written like this, though - it's more like "Hammer, meet peanut".
Jan
8
comment Meaning of “the seventies are calling”
'Twas a "dee-dee-dee-dee-deet" ringtone, very old sounding
Jan
4
comment Why does the multi-paragraph quotation rule exist?
Look at how J.R. used it in his answer - the identifying speaker is in the middle of the paragraph. That was how I was expecting the "embedded" quotes to read.
Jan
4
comment Why does the multi-paragraph quotation rule exist?
I disagree with it being a functional advantage - for years, almost every time I saw it, I would automatically think it was a quote of a quote, and have to correct myself, go back, and reread the passage again. Still, +1 for explaining why it's used that way.
Dec
27
comment Use of “Or”, inclusive or exclusive?
Isn't the negative "she couldn't read nor write"? Or does it not matter?
Dec
10
comment What is non-derogatory way of saying “people here are obsessed with sports”?
Sports fans I know would consider "obsessed" to be a compliment. It shows that we know they care about what happens..
Dec
5
comment Is “holiday” derived from “holy day”?
Huh, interesting. I always thought it came from "Holly day".. Pronunciation matches much better, after all.
Dec
3
comment is letter “y” derived from “ij”?
When I see "Bafiya", I say "Bah-fee-ya". When I see "Bafia" or "Bafya", I (usually) say "Baf-yah". I have no idea which is correct, but I'd need to see "Bafaia" or (more normal for English) "Bafaya" to pronounce it that third way; @Kris is that last one the real correct pronunciation?
Dec
1
answered Can we use “Do your Button” for “Close your button”?
Nov
30
comment What is it called when you “refill” a debit card?
@Jim My bank calls it this on the monthly statements (there are "credits", "checks", and "debits" sections), and I use the same terminology. +1
Nov
13
comment How many tenses are there in English?
Also, the time-travel tenses!
Nov
12
comment What is the word for “a series of two related works”?
+1 to this because it's what popped into my mind, and is the most likely one of the answers so far a layperson will both recognize as a word and understand the meaning of (do to the prevalence of "trilogy")