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location Chicago, IL
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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
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Sep
12
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
@RoaringFish Quantum mechanics
Sep
11
comment Why is “a” missing in “running like clockwork”
@JanusBahsJacquet I have to agree with Fumble here: "clockwork" is an adjective that describes spring-and-gear technology based off of how clocks work.
Sep
5
comment Word that describes someone that causes his own misfortune
@EdwinAshworth I'm not sure whether to +1 your comment or not for reminding me of the "Accident Prone" Lady Gaga parody...
Aug
24
comment What does “sit in the back of the bus” mean?
Personally, I find the meanings posted in the answers below kind of odd. In highschool (around 10 years ago), the back of the bus was the "cool" place to sit - so this seems to me like an idiom that is no longer true.
Aug
20
comment Word for a police man getting money from someone forcefully
@Beta "steal" doesn't imply stealth to me: "He just stole my purse!"
Aug
16
comment Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex'
@StoneyB Unless "Saxon" means "coast" (does it?), I don't see how that's relevant to my joke/comment...
Aug
16
comment Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex'
There seems to be one missing... Is there a.. hmm.. "Nosex"? ;)
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
Medium for... Cars? Magic? Electricity? The ambiguity of this term (which will require a second qualifying word) seems to negate its usefulness with the intended meaning in the question.
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
@JackRyan I'm bringing it up because the question specifically asks about in the context of a programming problem, which sounds like a video game of some sort to me. When thought of that way, almost every other answer just sounds bizarre and (in one or two cases) pretentious - and in others, ambiguous ("domain", for example, is much more broad than makes sense - you'd need to qualify what it is the domain of, negating the advantage of the term).
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
@JackRyan Within the context of video games, "terrain" is used (almost everywhere) for surfaces the players can traverse, provided there are no other obstacles (like a wall or building). This includes land and, often, water (some games don't allow players in the water), although I'm not so sure about air/space.
Aug
5
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
+1 from me because I've actually heard this used in this way before, unlike the current top answer's "reappropriation" - which I've never heard in this context before. Probably, that's just too technical for everyday speech, while "co-opt" is short and to the point.
Aug
4
comment A word that means that when two elements are mixed they become stronger
A quick Google search away: etymonline.com/index.php?term=synergy - it was probably just left out of that dictionary
Aug
1
comment What is a term for the hierarchical relationship between parent and child configuration options in software?
To be precise, it recursively enables/disables all immediate children. Usually, "children" informally includes grandchildren (and etc), making "recursively" redundant, yet at the same time, slightly more accurate...
Jul
30
comment How can I spell out Pope Francis’s remark on gay priests, ‘Who am I to judge?’
+1 @Mitch for "People really don't use 'whom' anymore"... It sounds archaic/Old English-y
Jul
28
comment Is there another way of saying “less is more”?
@RegDwighт Because "less is more" is reminiscent of Ingsoc slogans from Nineteen Eighty-Four, while alternatives below are not. I for one have never liked the phrase.
Jul
28
awarded  Yearling
Jul
24
comment What is a “blow-off answer”?
@AndrewNg Including "off" means to complete the act in question, while not including it means they may or may not have finished the NSFW action.
Jul
24
comment What is a “blow-off answer”?
A note to non-fluent English speakers: "blowing someone off" has another NSFW meaning (that "blow-off answer" does not have), so be careful with how you phrase/search for it.
Jul
24
comment What is “Gatcha” short for?
@AgustiRoig Almost certainly, unless it's referring to Gatchaman
Jul
22
comment “All roads lead to Rome”
Not really; "All roads lead to Rome" is common enough (and the "All roads lead to" part of the construct uncommon enough) that "All roads lead to <very important part of whatever project you're working on>" will be understood in English. Just remember that it's used conceptually like that, and not as a physical location.