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Sep
23
comment How correct is “quote, unquote” and where does its usage come from?
@MichaelEdenfield Also, when mocking someone, you'll hear "I read his quote 'manifesto', and I was not impressed.", where "manifesto" alone is in an obviously different tone of voice (the tone acting as the delimiter).
Sep
19
comment What do you call hypothetical inhabitants living on the Moon?
@Mari-LouA makes a good point - almost every suggestion here already has some sort of meaning, that lunar inhabitants might not want to associate themselves with. The answer, should an author come up with something good, might come out of nowhere - for example, to borrow the Japanese suffix for "person of ___", we could end up with "moonjin" or "lunajin" (like bib's suggestion of "moonmen" but not male-oriented).
Sep
19
comment What do you call hypothetical inhabitants living on the Moon?
Or you can do it by dropping a syllable from "Luna", making Loon(s).
Sep
13
comment English word equivalent of 膩 (sick of something due to overindulgence)
"fed up" usually refers to another person, I think, as compared to the others which are common with a person, thing, or activity
Sep
13
awarded  Pundit
Sep
12
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
@user3490 Oh, it's real, not just part of the mathematical model
Sep
12
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
@RoaringFish Quantum mechanics
Sep
11
comment Why is “a” missing in “running like clockwork”
@JanusBahsJacquet I have to agree with Fumble here: "clockwork" is an adjective that describes spring-and-gear technology based off of how clocks work.
Sep
5
comment Word that describes someone that causes his own misfortune
@EdwinAshworth I'm not sure whether to +1 your comment or not for reminding me of the "Accident Prone" Lady Gaga parody...
Aug
24
comment What does “sit in the back of the bus” mean?
Personally, I find the meanings posted in the answers below kind of odd. In highschool (around 10 years ago), the back of the bus was the "cool" place to sit - so this seems to me like an idiom that is no longer true.
Aug
20
comment Word for a police man getting money from someone forcefully
@Beta "steal" doesn't imply stealth to me: "He just stole my purse!"
Aug
16
comment Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex'
@StoneyB Unless "Saxon" means "coast" (does it?), I don't see how that's relevant to my joke/comment...
Aug
16
comment Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex'
There seems to be one missing... Is there a.. hmm.. "Nosex"? ;)
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
Medium for... Cars? Magic? Electricity? The ambiguity of this term (which will require a second qualifying word) seems to negate its usefulness with the intended meaning in the question.
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
@JackRyan I'm bringing it up because the question specifically asks about in the context of a programming problem, which sounds like a video game of some sort to me. When thought of that way, almost every other answer just sounds bizarre and (in one or two cases) pretentious - and in others, ambiguous ("domain", for example, is much more broad than makes sense - you'd need to qualify what it is the domain of, negating the advantage of the term).
Aug
15
comment Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
@JackRyan Within the context of video games, "terrain" is used (almost everywhere) for surfaces the players can traverse, provided there are no other obstacles (like a wall or building). This includes land and, often, water (some games don't allow players in the water), although I'm not so sure about air/space.
Aug
5
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
+1 from me because I've actually heard this used in this way before, unlike the current top answer's "reappropriation" - which I've never heard in this context before. Probably, that's just too technical for everyday speech, while "co-opt" is short and to the point.
Aug
4
comment A word that means that when two elements are mixed they become stronger
A quick Google search away: etymonline.com/index.php?term=synergy - it was probably just left out of that dictionary
Aug
1
comment What is a term for the hierarchical relationship between parent and child configuration options in software?
To be precise, it recursively enables/disables all immediate children. Usually, "children" informally includes grandchildren (and etc), making "recursively" redundant, yet at the same time, slightly more accurate...
Jul
30
comment How can I spell out Pope Francis’s remark on gay priests, ‘Who am I to judge?’
+1 @Mitch for "People really don't use 'whom' anymore"... It sounds archaic/Old English-y