924 reputation
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location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 2 days ago

Mar
17
comment What is a good idiom for deceptive smile?
Are you looking for deceptive as in the title, or fake? One is "Please trust me while I screw you over", the other is "Please believe I'm happy"
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@EricWilson Between 0.1% and 0.2% of live births are ambiguous enough to become the subject of specialist medical attention. Most do become one sex through surgery or preference, but the point is that it only appears to be so extremely rare because we as a society make it a point to hide them.
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@Waterseas Using that word, have to be wary of responses like: "Usually page foo of the kama sutra"
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@EricWilson "Intersex" is a thing, biologically male and female. "Other" is probably the polite way to put it.
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@GeorgeCummins I think that's more offensive, implying women sound like a man. Directly asking simply means you can't tell, which can be waved off as just low-quality audio on the phone.
Mar
6
comment Why is “distro”, rather than “distri”, short for “distribution” in Linux world?
I honestly think this is most correct. Directly chopping off the end of "distribution" to get "dis-trih" doesn't sound natural at all, and attempting to pluralize it as "dis-trihs" is even worse. Using an 'o' is the next closest vowel that doesn't sound bad.
Feb
13
comment Which definition of “atheism” is the proper usage?
@DavidRicherby Tristan's statement matches the version in the question from Wikipedia, and I agree with him. The first one is more about a claim of knowledge than belief (which I've heard before as the difference between "gnostic atheism" (borderline nonsensical) and "agnostic atheism"), and is a corruption of its usual intended meaning.
Jan
20
comment Is describing something as 'detailed and concise' an oxymoron?
It helps to think in terms of information density. Lots of information (detailed) in a small space (concise).
Jan
18
comment When should “no problem” replace “you're welcome” as a response to “thank you”?
I don't think the difference is minor; I've never used "You're welcome" because that implicit rudeness jumped out at me even back in gradeschool...
Dec
28
comment Why is quixotic pronounced as it is?
As an aside, to go with the other comments: Chicago suburbs, I learned the word more like "kicks-ottic". Dropped the "u" sound entirely.
Dec
28
comment Why is quixotic pronounced as it is?
"X" in English usually gives you an "sk" sound - I believe you meant "ks"?
Dec
23
comment “Hello” as a verb
Amusingly the "classic" example is steadily gaining meaning
Dec
21
comment Is there a term for “genocide” of the elderly?
@Cerberus Only 1 of the 3 dictionaries listed use the "medicine" qualifier. That word has already become more general than it originally was.
Dec
21
comment Is there a term for “genocide” of the elderly?
@Cerberus Geriatricide comes from geriatric, "Of or relating to the aged or to characteristics of the aging process." - I've seen it pretty often as well
Nov
26
comment Euphemism for poo
A lot of English speakers are going to see "pooh" and get confused at first, thinking of Winnie the Pooh, also known as Pooh Bear. What you're asking about doesn't have the 'h' on the end, although they are pronounced the same: Poo.
Nov
22
comment Why “e.g.” and not “f.e.”? Why “i.e.” and not “t.i.”?
As a native English speaker, I've never been able to keep those abbreviations straight, so don't worry - this is perfectly normal. I always write out the full "for example" and "that is", in plain English, which everyone would understand. (Well... those who know English would understand ;)
Nov
20
comment When someone falls and tries to stand up again. In one word?
+1 for stubborn - that's what the antagonist would call the hero
Nov
7
comment Why is “pineapple” in English but “ananas” in all other languages?
Best guess: It was an exotic name for an exotic fruit
Nov
7
comment What's the opposite of a “round number”?
@Kris 1000 being "round", which I do admit is very odd. Too much exposure to binary powers (2 ^ n), I suppose.
Nov
7
comment What's the opposite of a “round number”?
As a programmer, I disagree with your first assertion. 1024 (2 ^ 10) is "rounder" than 1000, which just rubs me the wrong way.