944 reputation
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location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 2 days ago

Dec
13
comment How do you describe someone who can hear you or see you but pretends or ignores your presence while you are trying to get his or her attention ?
Why isn't "ignore" sufficient?
Nov
17
comment Oil is slippery; rubber is _____?
@ermanen Not always, the bottoms of shoes can be grippy when wet
Nov
10
comment Does the quirky spelling in English actually make it easier to read?
@JasonOrendorff I pronounce "two" more like "tew", while there's no "w" sound in my "to" or "too"
Oct
25
comment Hypernym for “clock” and “watch”
@DavidK The difference is that the physical book has a physical component that tracks progress: The number of pages turned. E-readers do not, just a number on the screen. And don't forget, often analog clocks are made to tick seconds instead of having smooth motion. You can't measure partial seconds on my watch, for example, so it would technically not be analog by your description, except that is how it's described.
Oct
24
comment Hypernym for “clock” and “watch”
@bdsl Analog (adjective): "of or relating to a device or process in which data is represented by physical quantities that change continuously" - in this case, position through the story. It's just used in this manner most often with timepieces.
Oct
24
comment Hypernym for “clock” and “watch”
@CarSmack Being as pedantic as the person mentioned in the question, "analog devices" would also include books and exclude e-readers
Oct
23
comment Does “candlelight” mean “compare side by side”?
On Wikipedia, while it has a description further down for increasing/decreasing, the primary image at the top is one solid color. Both types are used, and I often see the colored one specified as a "highlighted" version.
Oct
23
comment Does “candlelight” mean “compare side by side”?
A note, the primary image on Wikipedia is simplified. Check out candlestick highlighting graphs - it uses coloration to show change. And "candlestick highlight" almost fits... Except not the image in the question.
Oct
13
comment Can “the rubber meets the road” be used as a stand-alone phrase to mean “stop disaster in its tracks or keep it at bay”?
@rogermue I can say the same of some old people. ;)
Sep
30
comment Do people pluralize “WiFi” with an “s”?
@ChristoferOlsson I have once or twice heard "wiffy" for "WiFi" from non-technical people, so I wouldn't be surprised if they tried to pluralize it as "wiffies"...
Sep
28
comment An English idiom for “solve a problem that has been solved”?
One that's not what you're looking for, but still fits the criteria: homework
Sep
18
comment Why is “cupboard” pronounced with a silent “p”?
@SamWashburn On the other hand, I'm a US native who adds a pause between the syllables, so "cup" and "board" are separately distinguishable as using "p" and "b"...
Sep
12
comment A little brain fart
You get some alliterative appeal by combining these, and I've heard it used before: "mental misfire"
Aug
20
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
Kristina's answer is short and to the point, but I definitely agree with the latter half of this answer. Even reading the description in the question, I can't figure out what "out" is supposed to be referring to. If the movie about breaking stereotypes, then that's definitely the wrong word to use...
Aug
20
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
Not just about others, I (and acquaintances) also use phrases like "I'm not out at work" or "I'm out to my family" and so on.
Jul
28
awarded  Yearling
Jul
17
comment Is “I believe x does not equal y” the same as “I don't believe x equals y”
@JohnLawler He's certainly not unique, because I do the same thing, and remember making the distinction when I was very young - somewhere around 8-9 years old (in particular, when I was in 3rd grade at school).
Jul
5
comment Does 'twink' imply a specific sexuality?
@KitFox By the way, for an actual reference on physical characteristics: Gay Cliques Census
Jul
5
comment Does 'twink' imply a specific sexuality?
@KitFox A twink has the physical characteristics of: thin, looks young(ish), and little to no body hair. Mannerisms and implication of being gay, I'm uncertain of, although I always understood it to be a gay-community-only thing (like Janus says, straight guys probably wouldn't appreciate it)
Jun
26
comment “Soccer mom”: why soccer?
This may have been part of the accidental uglier picture of "soccer mom", but I've also always understood such moms to live a sheltered life and/or raise their kids in such a way