924 reputation
58
bio website
location Chicago, IL
age 26
visits member for 3 years
seen 2 hours ago

5h
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
Kristina's answer is short and to the point, but I definitely agree with the latter half of this answer. Even reading the description in the question, I can't figure out what "out" is supposed to be referring to. If the movie about breaking stereotypes, then that's definitely the wrong word to use...
5h
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
Not just about others, I (and acquaintances) also use phrases like "I'm not out at work" or "I'm out to my family" and so on.
Jul
28
awarded  Yearling
Jul
17
comment Is “I believe x does not equal y” the same as “I don't believe x equals y”
@JohnLawler He's certainly not unique, because I do the same thing, and remember making the distinction when I was very young - somewhere around 8-9 years old (in particular, when I was in 3rd grade at school).
Jul
5
comment Does 'twink' imply a specific sexuality?
@KitFox By the way, for an actual reference on physical characteristics: Gay Cliques Census
Jul
5
comment Does 'twink' imply a specific sexuality?
@KitFox A twink has the physical characteristics of: thin, looks young(ish), and little to no body hair. Mannerisms and implication of being gay, I'm uncertain of, although I always understood it to be a gay-community-only thing (like Janus says, straight guys probably wouldn't appreciate it)
Jun
26
comment “Soccer mom”: why soccer?
This may have been part of the accidental uglier picture of "soccer mom", but I've also always understood such moms to live a sheltered life and/or raise their kids in such a way
Jun
24
comment “When I was in college…” Do you really mean college? Or university?
Where would "institute" fall in this spectrum? ;)
Jun
17
comment What does “Nothing doing as he took it right to him” mean?
@Bort I've heard "nothing doing" like once or twice before. The memory is very vague and very old (and I'm 26), so I'm thinking it's an idiom that's not generally used anymore
May
22
comment What's it called? A kind of impoliteness
I've heard "cheeky bastard" in American English, but not "cheek" alone
May
18
comment Is 'Success!' ever used as a spoken/written encouragement?
I think "godspeed" has gained connotations of terrible consequences if you fail. Not something you want them to think about when your message is more along the lines of a hopeful "good luck!", which would explain why it fell out of use.
Apr
16
comment What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?
@DenisKulagin First off the top of my head is a simple "Shall we go now?" when random conversations happen instead of going somewhere (to lunch as a group, for example). 'Tis not enough for a full answer, though.
Apr
16
comment What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?
@JanusBahsJacquet I use "shall" regularly in the US. It's like a more forceful version of "should", and rolls off the tongue much more easily for some phrases.
Mar
30
comment Word for people who live in the same city
This word also works without specifying a city: "The locals and I are..."
Mar
27
comment What are people who 'flee' called?
Plus a note: I believe you pronounce this as "flee-er", it does not rhyme with "rear".
Mar
27
comment What is the name of the tactic that politicians use to bury people with torrent of words?
@OwenBlacker It instead reminds me of how politicians talk on TV/in interviews, outside of Congress, all the time
Mar
27
comment What is the name of the tactic that politicians use to bury people with torrent of words?
@OwenBlacker Question asks for "waste people's time", not "stall for time". The difference is slight, but it's the difference between the two words.
Mar
25
comment What's the antonym of “prioritize”?
@msam Everything has some priority, even if that happens to be the same as everything else. "Deprioritize" can be used even if something has not been explicitly prioritized - it would then just mean "after everything else".
Mar
23
comment Is there a better term for a male pig [literal sense--the animal] than “boar”?
A note on "stag", since it's not the common usage of the word: When used in this context, it means any animal that was castrated after reaching sexual maturity, or cattle or sheep castrated before sexual maturity.
Mar
23
comment Is “Is it a girl or a boy?” really calling the infant an “it”?
@BraddSzonye Except when they is used specifically because you don't know - like asking about a third person who happens to be androgynous: Are they male or female?