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20h
comment Using article “the” when addressing a general category in an article
I definitely agree that your way sounds fine too for exactly that reason.
20h
comment Is there a verb for making something continuous?
Using obscure words is rarely a good idea in technical writing where clarity of communication is what's important. Be explicit and write "made continuous".
20h
answered Using article “the” when addressing a general category in an article
1d
comment What slang connotations can “bill” have in British English?
Could just be that they were laughing that she had to change it.
1d
comment Is “What the problem isn't, is that they're too attentive” an oxymoron?
Not every way we can string together words in English is valid so it's not necessarily the case that any of those sentences have a "polarity". I don't know if they are "technically" correct by exact grammar rules but they are certainly hard to understand -- even the phrase "what the problem is" at the beginning of a sentence feels a little off to me. Instead, say something like "The problem isn't that they're too attentive."
1d
comment What does “So you are going to be famous ?!” express?
This seems like more a subjective discussion of how human conversation works rather than the rules of language. The statement "So you are going to be famous?" is indeed a question that can be responded to, for example, with "Yes, we are the opening act in tomorrow's big concert!" or "No, because it's just a school gig." "So you're going to be famous!" could also just be an exclamation where no actual response is expected, but someone is just expressing their amazement that someone is getting famous. I guess it depends on context.
Sep
26
accepted Word that means 'most common example'?
Sep
26
asked Word that means 'most common example'?
Sep
23
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
27
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
27
awarded  Yearling
Jul
11
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
24
comment Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb?
What is a complement phrase? Anyway, this article goes into detail about what I think you're talking about
Jun
24
comment “When I was in college…” Do you really mean college? Or university?
@Luis No, that's not right. He would say "When I was in medical school". Peter is right that college means undergraduate program.
Jun
24
answered “When I was in college…” Do you really mean college? Or university?
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
May
16
awarded  Nice Answer