245 reputation
29
bio website localhost
location United States
age 38
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Feb 3 at 14:51

Full time J2EE & Jave EE developer / Part time PhD candidate
I am really keen on computational linguistics.


Mar
13
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
9
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
5
comment What are the possible part of speech combinations for compound nouns?
@Mynamite Likely a tagger would say Ham is NN (noun singular) and and is CC (coordinating conjunction) meaning that they are both tokens and once again we do not have 2 nouns in a row. However, it all depends on how the tagger is trained. In this case, I don't think ham and cheese would be learned as a compound noun due to its rareness in written text even though I am sure it is very tasty.
Apr
5
awarded  Commentator
Apr
5
comment What are the possible part of speech combinations for compound nouns?
@Mynamite I do agree with you on that one, thanks. I didn't say this outright, but I am a computational linguist and so when using taggers, the comma would count as a token and therefore possess a part of speech tag meaning it would not be two nouns for me. Just a different perspective of looking at things I guess.
Apr
4
asked What are the possible part of speech combinations for compound nouns?
Feb
22
comment Suggestion phrased as a question
A side question (I will start a new question if it is better). So "Would you show me your ID, sir" is interrogative because of syntax (the presence of the question mark) and is not imperative (even though pragmatically it is imperative)?
Feb
11
accepted In English, is there an established prefix for “mostly”?
Feb
11
comment In English, is there an established prefix for “mostly”?
Ok, I think will take quasi as a good enough even though not optimal solution. I am going to count on putting quasi and semi next to each other and the observer being able to detect that quasi > semi in nature. In this case, semi carries more the "somewhat" or "sort of" meaning as discussed by @Jon Hanna.
Feb
11
accepted Is “dispreferred” a mainstream word in English?
Feb
11
asked In English, is there an established prefix for “mostly”?
Dec
27
awarded  Yearling
Dec
27
asked Is “dispreferred” a mainstream word in English?
Aug
29
comment Most Common Parses of the English language?
@Mikhail Likely not, but it depends upon the vocab I am working with. I think I am going to do some light anaylsis as a strart myself like maybe take 100 news articles, extract sentences and run it through the Stanford POS tool, but I don't have the time or resources currently to develop my own extensive corpus so I was hoping there would be some numbers somewhere.
Aug
28
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
28
comment Most Common Parses of the English language?
@Mikhail Given a POS-tag sequence and a vocabulary which is a very small subset of the English language, come up with a valid English sentence. Or perhaps better, given said vocabulary and a couple of related POS-tag sequences, try to do the same thing for any one sequence.
Aug
28
comment Most Common Parses of the English language?
@StoneyB That makes sense, but sometimes when you say a specific language, they frown on your question.
Aug
28
awarded  Editor
Aug
28
revised Most Common Parses of the English language?
simple mistake