260 reputation
27
bio website davidrivers.name
location Arlington, VA
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Jan 31 at 19:20

Self-taught, having pursued Web development as a hobby for a while, I have been getting paid for this passion since 2006. I currently have a good job with a great company, but I occasionally take on side work. I am also on GitHub and on LinkedIn.


Feb
7
awarded  Necromancer
Dec
14
comment Can you outfish, out-fish, or out fish someone?
I can't agree more about creative neologisms. English is an evolving language that doesn't need dictionaries as aristocratic gatekeepers if meaning is conveyed effectively.
Dec
13
comment Asks a question; never responds to answers/comments
I understand, but lack sympathy, for such a distracted asker. The scenario reminds me of agreeing to have lunch with someone who then spends the entire time playing with her mobile device. If an asker is going to provoke a conversation, then she should have the respect for answerers to see it through.
Dec
13
awarded  Yearling
Dec
12
answered A word to describe the color of hair that is nearly jet-black, but slightly brown?
Dec
12
answered Asks a question; never responds to answers/comments
Dec
12
comment Word for “food only partially eaten”
+1 for raising the question that the food source in question may or may not be shared. The connotation of the adjective the asker seeks could be very different depending on cultural context.
Nov
28
awarded  Critic
Nov
28
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
-1 Please amend or delete your answer if you concede that English is not actually Latin-based.
Nov
28
comment What's a word for avoiding a question with a generic (fake) answer?
Improvement: "That's not an answer--that, sir, is circumbendibusical!"
Nov
28
awarded  Commentator
Nov
28
comment How do I say “something contains a lot of content” using a single word?
...or if someone is said to be "positively bloated" :P
Nov
28
comment How do I say “something contains a lot of content” using a single word?
@bracho I agree. Something may also contain a lot of useless or noisy content, which may not meet the asker's needs.
Nov
28
revised Why use 'being' in this sentence?
added 51 characters in body
Nov
28
answered Why use 'being' in this sentence?
Nov
28
comment What is the proper grammatical terminology to describe this parenthetical remark?
"...which is discussed later" is an equally concise alternative to this ambiguous, robotic phrase.
Nov
28
comment Should you say RIP when you know someone commits suicide?
You shouldn't say "RIP" or "rest in peace" because it is a cliché.
Nov
28
comment Word for one who does not eat onions
To be pedantic, I wouldn't recommend anyone to expect what you mean by a Latin-Greek behemoth of a neologism.
Nov
28
comment What is the rule for adjective order?
I object with anything named "royal", as well as the notion of king- or queendom.
Nov
28
comment Version control messages: what tense?
#1 in your added examples is the most concise (extremely useful when integrating frequent changes in a large team) and grammatically answers the question "What does this commit do?", which is why I believe my answer is best.