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location Yerevan, Armenia
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awarded  Enlightened
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awarded  Nice Answer
1d
comment complete the following sentences by adding a prefix or suffix to th word in brackets
Are you sure you haven't missed any words? I am failing to complete a sentence by just adding a suffix or prefix to "percept".
Mar
20
comment Will you come with
I have found results of a survey in the US which shows that the majority of people would favor "with us". Geographical distribution included: www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_51.html
Mar
20
comment Universal Words?
@PCARR: Not Vodka: in Armenian Vodka is օղի /oghi/, in Georgian - არაყი /arakghi/
Mar
20
comment What do you call the source of a “said” quote?
Author still works, IMO
Mar
17
comment What single word means “uncritique-able”?
read the question again
Mar
16
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
15
comment What is it called when something appears so obvious, no one expects it?
When I was in sixth or seventh grade, our history teacher gave us a surprise test. I was unprepared and had nothing to lose, so I just put the textbook in front of me and started copying. When she got to my desk to check if I was cheating I proudly said: "I'm clean, see, I have nothing to hide" and lifted the open textbook to let her see I was hiding nothing underneath. It worked :D
Mar
15
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
15
accepted “Country” is to “compatriot” as “species” is to what?
Mar
14
comment “Country” is to “compatriot” as “species” is to what?
I think "specimen" is to "species" as "citizen" is to "country". Doesn't imply belonging to the same species or country, although I agree context may eliminate the ambiguity.
Mar
14
asked “Country” is to “compatriot” as “species” is to what?
Mar
12
comment Are there rules how 'g' is pronounced as /j/ or /g/?
The best rule is to remember each word on its own. However, one particular pattern that comes to mind is that g is pronounced /dʒ/ before e, i, y in word of latin origin.
Mar
10
answered what does “deliver” mean in the context?
Mar
9
comment Difference between “of preventing” and “for preventing”
Yes, both sentences are grammatically correct
Mar
8
comment Who or whom in a sentence
@Anonym: Yes, when it's an object of anything.
Mar
8
comment Who or whom in a sentence
I disagree with your first sentence. I'd say "whom can only be used when it is the object of a verb". Who can be used both as subject and object nowadays.
Mar
8
comment Who or whom in a sentence
Programming skills are an important criterion by which we choose who(m) to hire. (whom and who both work - whom sounds a bit pompous)
Mar
5
comment Can “dare” be followed by a present continuous tense?
@WS2: to drink, to have drunk, to be drinking - all of these are infinitive, since they do not have person, number, tense etc. They do have some sort of aspect though.