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location Yerevan, Armenia
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 34 mins ago

1h
awarded  Nice Answer
4h
comment Quantifiers “most” vs. “most of”
I may be very naive, but what danger do the other 10% of the flowers bought at the airport pose?
5h
comment Sorry I'm late, the car wouldn't start this morning!
@Mari-LouA: How is Josh61's "tip" related to "the present perfect bit" which I have allegedly avoided? O_O
5h
comment Can “it” be used with plural subject?
+1, but why are you in exile, John?
6h
revised Sorry I'm late, the car wouldn't start this morning!
added 270 characters in body
6h
comment Sorry I'm late, the car wouldn't start this morning!
@Mari-LouA: I never said they can't. I just explained what won't/wouldn't means in this context. To answer your question: Because you're specifying a time in the past "this morning", the past simple would be much more natural, i.e. My car didn't start. But it's just a factual statement while wouldn't is more emotional
6h
answered Sorry I'm late, the car wouldn't start this morning!
17h
revised Past Simple or Past Perfect?
added 4 characters in body
17h
revised Past Simple or Past Perfect?
added 1 character in body
18h
comment “Will have been seen” is it gramatically correct?
Both are grammatically correct. Meaning-wise, the first sentence is much more natural.
18h
revised Past Simple or Past Perfect?
added 4 characters in body
18h
comment “With whom” vs. “with who”
It is perfectly legal in Standard English to say "Whom are you hanging out with?". Although I perceive a register dissonance between the formal "whom" and the informal "hang out". The dissonance, however, is equally present in your first example.
18h
answered Past Simple or Past Perfect?
18h
answered Declension is a noun. What is the verb?
1d
comment single word for “positive attribute”
advantage, pro, virtue
Oct
28
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
26
answered Is “to boil down” formal enough to be used in scientific writing?
Oct
25
comment Can aforementioned be used to mean “As I mentioned in…”?
Simply mentioned will work
Oct
23
awarded  Famous Question