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seen May 25 at 2:30

Degree in computer science, some interest in linguistics. Know English as a second language, native language Norwegian.


Dec
6
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
13
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Aug
15
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
18
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
8
awarded  Constituent
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Feb
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
comment Is there a word for a 60th of a second?
There's nothing special about 60 fps in game development, except that most monitors have a 60 Hz refresh rate so framerates above 60 fps are not visible. In practice, framerates are all over the map depending on settings, resolution, graphics card power etc., and may vary from frame to frame depending on the complexity of the scene. As a unit of time, I think it leaves something to be desired :)
Sep
9
awarded  Yearling
Aug
1
comment What is the oldest common English word?
@Malvolio If I understand the press release correctly, together with this article, these are the words that have changed the least from Proto-Indo-European to today. They mention 'water' as well, but say that the numerals appear to be the most change resistant of them all.
Jul
31
answered What is the oldest common English word?
Jul
20
comment How can I describe a “one or more” condition (one that has many options; a “non-boolean”)?
For the opposite of boolean (ex. "green? yes/no"), I'd go with fuzzy (ex. "slightly green") or probabilistic (ex. "10% chance of being green") . Although they do not apply to the "one or more" conditions you are asking for.
Jul
4
comment Why did English become a universal language and when?
@Kosmonaut I suppose the power of a language is a function of the number of people and nationalities that will understand it. By that metric I suppose English, Spanish and Chinese are the top contenders.
Jun
8
awarded  Commentator
Jun
8
comment Why are names abbreviated in translations?
@Kit There's a reference for that in the link from Colin: "Initials, blanks, or both were often substituted for proper names in nineteenth century fiction to enhance the illusion of reality. It is as if the author felt it necessary to delete the names for reasons of tact or legal liability."
Jun
6
answered What is the origin of the phrase “to take a rain check”
Jun
6
comment What is the difference between an apocalypse and a cataclysm?
To my mind, Armageddon is a specific type of apocalypse: A battle between supernatural forces at the end of the world, like Ragnarök in Norse mythology. While 'apocalypse' is "the end of civilization" by any means, including aliens, zombies, meteorites, natural disasters, nuclear war etc..
Mar
5
awarded  Enthusiast
Feb
14
comment Why does spelling matter?
Mark Twain might agree with you: I don't see any use in having a uniform and arbitrary way of spelling words. We might as well make all clothes alike and cook all dishes alike. On the other hand, looking at his plan for the improvement of English spelling, I think there is something to be said for a language where you, 20 years into the future, are still able to read what you wrote today ;)