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seen Apr 28 at 15:43

Apr
17
answered Do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates?
Apr
3
comment Must be paid before the 8th May?
Literally, it means you're late if you pay on May 8. Whether that's what was intended depends on context we don't have.
Mar
28
comment Adjectival “Anglican” for “English”, and “Anglicanism” for “Anglomania” in AmE
@Oldcat Oh, I completely agree; my point is that a bunch of dictionaries the English language do not (necessarily) make.
Mar
28
comment Adjectival “Anglican” for “English”, and “Anglicanism” for “Anglomania” in AmE
I guess there are two schools of thought on what constitutes a language. One school of thought would hold that an academy rigorously defines and controls a language and the language is what the academy puts into a book. Another school of thought would hold that a language is defined by how people use it to communicate. Neither school is right or wrong, but they are different, and different places favor different schools. As a member of the latter school, I hesitate to call using Anglican for English wrong - if its meaning is clear in context, how can it be wrong? - but this is uncommon.
Mar
28
comment Adjectival “Anglican” for “English”, and “Anglicanism” for “Anglomania” in AmE
What tchrist and Oldcat said. It's all well and good that three reliable sources online say something, but good luck finding any Americans who will admit to using Anglican to mean English.
Mar
28
comment What adverb, typical of AmE, coincides the most with the BrE sense to “quite” [=to a noticeable or partial extent]?
As an American, I've got to disagree that "quite pretty" would generally be understood to mean "somewhat pretty".
Mar
28
comment What adverb, typical of AmE, coincides the most with the BrE sense to “quite” [=to a noticeable or partial extent]?
You could say, "That girl is pretty enough." The meaning is, more or less, that the girl is indeed pretty, although she could be more pretty. This may emphasize the lack of the quality more than saying "quite" would, though, and as such might not be exactly what you had in mind.
Dec
13
comment Looking for a word that describes mental retardation in computer programmers
It just sounds like you're a Java programmer. ducks
Dec
13
comment Mileage as unit-agnostic term
+1 Interesting to think that one day, the average person may not really understand where words come from or why they're the way they are. You lose context. Of course, I suppose it's no different for us. How many people have ever used a telephone with a dial, for instance?
Dec
13
comment Why don’t “snow” and “plow” — well, or “plough” — rhyme?
Because English. That's why.
Dec
13
comment Hypernym for “import” and “export”?
@Mitch I'd say make that an answer. That's as right as right can be.
Dec
13
comment “How to […]?” and “Where to […]?” Questions that are not questions. Is this defensible?
If anybody gave you a warning about asking "How do you punctuate a list of questions?", they are being boorish pedants. Of course, this is a Q&A site about English grammar, so carry on. In real life, nobody would ever misunderstand your question to be about opinions, unless they are also boorish pedants not to be trifled with. Of course, you can get around this entire mess by using "should" instead of "do", which, when used in questions on grammar, should be pretty unambiguous.
Jul
21
awarded  Yearling
Apr
23
comment Do you have to capitalize a question that is after a comma?
Yeah, this just looks like a grammatical error to me - or at least, it's a suspect usage. These are separate clauses that could stand alone as separate sentences.
Mar
18
comment What is the past participle of the verb open?
In that sense, this answer is spot-on: opened, even when used as an adjective, references the associated action on the item, whereas open has mainly to do with the item itself.
Mar
18
comment What is the past participle of the verb open?
@Gael "The door had been opened" signifies that, at some fixed point in the past, someone observed that someone had opened the door previously. "The door was open", on the other hand, signifies not only that the door had been opened, but that it had not been closed. So the door might have been opened, but may not have remained so. Note that it's also possible to manufacture a door in the open position. In that case, one would say "the door was open", but it would be technically incorrect to say that "the door had been opened".
Feb
4
answered Is there a UK/US difference in the usage of in/to + verb (for example, “this tool helps in dealing with this/to deal with this”)?
Jan
24
comment Cardinal British Dates - A Kiwi Original?
I am an American, and that sounds weird to me. I would say "October the twenty-first, twenty twelve" or similar, with "the" optional. I would never say "October twenty-one" under any circumstances, although I'd probably write "October 21, 2012" instead of "October 21st, 2012" or "October the 21st, 2012". I would find hearing "October twenty-one, twenty twelve" quite jarring, and "twenty-one October twenty-twelve" jarring and sounding like a quaint Britishism.
Jan
21
comment Written date formats in US English: how jarring is it to use the UK format?
"14 December 2005" would strike me as non-standard but perfectly understandable. "14-12-2005" or similar would be quite jarring. Why don't you just write the date in a format that's appropriate to your audience? It seems like the easiest solution is just to use the American format, whatever you determine that to be. To me, "December 14, 2005", or "December the 14th, 2005", or "12-14-2005" would fit the bill.
Jul
21
awarded  Yearling