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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Oct 29 at 15:16

Apr
15
answered Boolean OR in English
Feb
11
answered “Replace with” versus “replace by”
Feb
11
comment What are you having?
The first and third are so tired that I find them annoying. If a server spoke to me in that manner, I might find that I was in the mood to go to a different restaurant.
Feb
11
comment A verb meaning to have something pointed “inserted” on one's leg?
"in my arm?" I think "into" is correct.
Feb
9
awarded  Critic
Feb
9
comment What does “have a pastrami on wry” mean?
-1: the substitution is intentional
Jan
30
comment Can “retrospectively” be used in this manner?
IMO "In response" is fine, but "In light of this" is metaphorical, and implies that new evidence has appeared, e.g. a cache of records, a fossil, a scientific discovery. So here I feel that "in light of this" is both verbose and inapt.
Jan
30
comment Can “retrospectively” be used in this manner?
"In light of this" sacrifices clarity for no purpose at all.
Jan
29
awarded  Commentator
Jan
24
comment Can you use “extremely lesser” in a sentence?
@Gagnus: phrases like "as hot and cold treatments have become popular and proven to be benefical" indicate the writer is attempting to be serious and persuasive. However, the writer has not yet mastered written English, and the effect is like a child attempting to use big words.
Jan
24
comment Can you use “extremely lesser” in a sentence?
@Gagnus: the entire post under question is poorly written, obviously by a non-native speaker who is not yet fluent in standard English. The use of the cliched metaphor "diving head-first" in a discussion of aquatic spa treatments is particularly inapt. One imagines a customer literally diving head-first into the bath.
Jan
24
awarded  Yearling
Jan
24
comment Can you use “extremely lesser” in a sentence?
ok, it's "intensive" in this case
Jan
24
revised Can you use “extremely lesser” in a sentence?
deleted 33 characters in body
Jan
24
revised Can you use “extremely lesser” in a sentence?
added 33 characters in body
Jan
24
answered Can you use “extremely lesser” in a sentence?
Jan
24
comment Can you use “extremely lesser” in a sentence?
"Not so" is extremely informal, and would make the author seem to be not so serious.
Jan
24
revised Is the word order acceptable here?
deleted 3 characters in body
Jan
24
answered Should there be a comma after “he added” if I'm not quoting?
Jan
24
comment Should there be a comma after “he added” if I'm not quoting?
I find that it parses more easily with with the addition of "that": "Mr. Smith stated that the ... He added that"