177 reputation
6
bio website comindwork.com
location Kiev, Ukraine
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Mar 1 at 12:28

Aug
2
revised “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
deleted 1 characters in body
Aug
2
accepted “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
Aug
2
comment “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
I think your answer is the correct one. Later in these lyrics, we can find: So I goes to the landlady, I said, "You let me slide?" And following your link I found a similar example: So I stay(s) too.
Aug
2
revised “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
deleted 6 characters in body
Aug
1
awarded  Custodian
Aug
1
reviewed Approve suggested edit on “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
Aug
1
asked “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
Feb
27
revised Can I replace “that is/are (supposed) to” with just “to”?
retagged
Nov
29
revised Can I replace “that is/are (supposed) to” with just “to”?
added 1 characters in body
Oct
28
awarded  Organizer
Oct
28
revised “She is gone” versus “she has gone”
added tags
Oct
28
suggested suggested edit on “She is gone” versus “she has gone”
Oct
18
suggested suggested edit on Linguistic differences between these two sentences
Oct
14
comment Position of “now”
@BillFranke All three correspond to the "present time" meaning. "Отныне" is strictly translated as "from now on". The difference between "сейчас" and "теперь" is far harder to explain. "Теперь" is closer to "отныне" and implies a contraposition between present and past. "Сейчас" is just "currently", "at the moment", "at present" without any reference to past. Kris's answer seems really close to this difference.
Oct
14
accepted Position of “now”
Oct
13
comment Position of “now”
@BillFranke You're right. In Russian, we have several words (сейчас, теперь, отныне) that can be translated as 'now', but nevertheless have slightly different meaning. I'm trying to understand whether this difference is expressed by word order in English.
Oct
13
asked Position of “now”
Sep
29
awarded  Scholar
Sep
29
accepted Can I replace “that is/are (supposed) to” with just “to”?
Sep
29
comment Can I replace “that is/are (supposed) to” with just “to”?
Thank you for so detailed explanation of my "second level of expansion". But what about the "first level"? Why can we just omit "that/which is"?