Reputation
1,351
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
1 9 15
Impact
~732k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 18 votes cast
Dec
29
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Jun
18
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Aug
16
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
22
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
27
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
May
17
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
2
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Jul
20
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
22
revised How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
edited body
Jun
19
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
Hi Mark, is there that official standard for recording for the blind available somewhere, I'd like to improve my answer with this information which I think is relevant.
Jun
18
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
Thks, no offense taken. See you on another question.
Jun
18
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
If there was a well defined and consistent Formula-to-English grammar standard available that all factions of science agree on, it'd be something interesting to look at.
Jun
18
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
On the example you've shown the upvoted answer was clearly upvoted because its purpose was to be amusing which isn't the case here so it's not a valid point of comparison. At any rate, my only point is that in the absence of a consistent and well defined grammar for describing mathematical formulas in English language, the point here is to make sure your audience understands you which I think was achieved here. Since this is what I consider was the goal of this question, I think this solution is also "right". I think I'll leave it to that now. I appreciate the passionate discussion. Thks.
Jun
18
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
Ok Macro. I won't entertain this any longer, as neither you or I are in a position or has the authority to determine what is more correct or what's not. I think enough food for thought was brought to the table here, and the reader will choose what he prefers. I do not agree that this will come up only in the context of mathematics (it may come up in any scientific presentation, and even non-scientific ones). Based on the votes, I see no reason to be in denial that the public here does find this variation clearer than OP's original one.
Jun
18
awarded  Commentator