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bio website wordsmyth.org
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 40
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 3 hours ago

Full-time software engineer and part-time writer.


3h
comment “walking for five o'clock every morning.” “for”? Why not “at five o'clock”?
Indeed, the US usage would be "gets into work by 6 o'clock" (or even "at 6" depending on your emphasis).
2d
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
15
answered What is the correct term to describe literary works that are only partly fictional?
Mar
3
comment Is “Stand-Your-Ground law” an official legal term? What is meant by “stand-in-your-ground”?
@Mazura - That's more of a legal question than an English language question, and I am not a lawyer. They are related but different. Here is some info for you though.
Feb
17
comment What does “Anyone who is married” mean in “Anyone who is married should know that facts and logic are not always helpful to one’s cause”?
Personally I don't get the off-topic votes. The OP correctly presumed the literal interpretation of the words so it's not like he's asking for someone to look it up in a dictionary. It may seem obvious to a native speaker, but perhaps the married joke/idiom is something that doesn't cross cultures very well, and it seems like something that would be difficult to Google for. Seems like a legitimate question to me. I have voted to reopen.
Jan
30
awarded  word-choice
Jan
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
26
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
3
comment Lack of commas or just misunderstanding
I believe this is one possible valid interpretation, but as Andreas' other answer shows, there are other possible interpretations as well. It is unclear.
Jan
3
awarded  Curious
Jan
2
comment Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts
I agree with a lot of what you have, but I'm still shaky on the idea that this is 'fundamentally' a noun. (I may have used the wrong word there.) "Home" is a word that it seems have equally-weighted adjectival, adverbial, noun(al?) and verbal uses. How does one call it 'fundamentally' anything in the abstract? Now in a given instance one can say it's acting one way or the other, but by what criteria would we argue that one use is more basic than another?
Jan
2
comment Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts
@Araucaria - If there is a grammar that answers this question then that is exactly the sort of answer I'm looking for. As it stands, I lack access to such a reference and the general reference meta list doesn't seem to have one. I have only the definition of adjective = "a word that modifies a noun", which every schoolchild knows. "Chicken" in "chicken soup" appears to fit that definition, hence my confusion. I am not a linguist - that's why I'm asking here!
Jan
2
comment Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts
@EdwinAshworth - I think the stuff in that other question is pretty much what I'm looking for, but it's so buried amidst discussions that I hesitate to support this as a "duplicate". Also it lacks any references cited.
Jan
2
asked Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts
Dec
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
25
answered 911: nine one one vs. nine eleven
Dec
22
comment What's the corresponding term for the mouth?
@EdwinAshworth - Is there some reason you think it doesn't fit in that circumstance? Often 'when one oughtn't' is when it would be unpleasant, so I believe it works just fine.
Dec
19
reviewed Close What is the meaning of “laughing out”?