11,393 reputation
22153
bio website wordsmyth.org
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 39
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 1 min ago

Full-time software engineer and part-time writer.


1h
comment What is a word for the most basic form of a term?
@SrJoven - It doesn't mean it is the smallest either. And there can be things which "can't be simplified further" which also cannot grow further. There is some overlap with germ, but I really don't think it's what the OP is looking for.
3h
comment What is a word for the most basic form of a term?
"Germ of a brilliant idea" has a context of growth, as @200_success mentioned. While one can literally argue that "initial stage from which something can develop" could also apply to "a word describing a very simple idea", it does not flow idiomatically for me.
10h
answered What is a word for the most basic form of a term?
10h
comment What's the meaning of “pillage and plunder”?
@shizlue - Having not seen the show, it is difficult for me to speculate based solely on one line of dialogue. One would not normally find pillage/plunder in the same train of thought as dating. Are they pirates? Are they going to rob someone? That is where expanding your question to include a bit more information about what was going on, what research you've done, and why you're still confused would be helpful.
10h
comment What's the meaning of “pillage and plunder”?
I am sure @medica's intention is not to humiliate but rather to teach the proper use of the site. A general reference would be pillage and plunder. You might also be interested in this question. If there's something about the straightforward definition you do not understand, you can add that to your question.
2d
answered Why 'aye aye sir' instead of 'yes sir' in naval response?
Oct
19
comment Semicolons before buts, ands, and sos, and other strange places?
There is no single authoritative source of "right" and "wrong", but based on the most prevalent conventions, yes. Grammar Girl for instance writes "never use semicolons with coordinating conjunctions such as and, or, and but", but Grammar Monster suggests it's OK if one of the phrases has a comma within it. See also this other related question.
Oct
18
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
15
comment What is meant by “downgrade dance” in computer science?
Not sure if this counts as "general" reference, but the answer is earlier in the article itself. "To work with legacy servers, many TLS clients implement a downgrade dance: in a first handshake attempt..."
Oct
14
comment can a discussion be “contentious”
I think this is general reference. One definition of 'contentious' is involving heated discussion, so the usage is entirely appropriate. You can also have a non-contentious, healthy discussion about a contentious (controversial) subject.
Oct
13
comment Can “the rubber meets the road” be used as a stand-alone phrase to mean “stop disaster in its tracks or keep it at bay”?
@Robusto - Yes, I agree, but the contrast just didn't work for me. Just a personal thing.
Oct
13
comment Can “the rubber meets the road” be used as a stand-alone phrase to mean “stop disaster in its tracks or keep it at bay”?
@DominicCronin - The phrase originated with regards to cars according to various definitions, but yes - one can extrapolate it to shoes as well.
Oct
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
13
answered Can “the rubber meets the road” be used as a stand-alone phrase to mean “stop disaster in its tracks or keep it at bay”?
Oct
13
comment The phrase: “It was the better part of our conversation”: does it mean qualitative or time spent?
General reference - see idiom definition and dictionary definition. Your usage is fine.
Oct
11
answered “Indian Indian”, “English English”, “television television” - Is there a term for this kind of reduplication?
Oct
9
revised Word Choice: Certain or Definite?
clarified with respect to the OP's example
Oct
9
answered Word Choice: Certain or Definite?
Oct
9
comment On second glance, at second glance, on a second glancing, etc
Yeah, it almost seems like someone's mixing up "on second thought" and "at first glance".
Oct
9
comment What does Amber Gated mean?
I've never heard the phrase or anything like it, and Google turns up nothing useful. It must be some kind of punishment short of firing (otherwise a 'warning' makes no sense), but who knows what. If it's company-specific, it might be defined in a glossary or something earlier in the manual.