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1d
reviewed Approve Help with Plural Objects and Subjects
1d
answered Word for birth year and death year?
1d
comment Is “crash into a bend” BrE and must there be a structure at the bend in order to use the phrase?
@pazzo - #10 states that the driver "failed to negotiate a bend... and crashed into a tree". It is only later in the article that the author, while paraphrasing a direct quote from "Jill", references crashing into the bend. Perhaps those were her words or the author thought it was a nice turn of phrase. But without the context of the larger article, saying someone crashed into a bend is as silly as saying they crashed into thin air.
1d
comment Is “crash into a bend” BrE and must there be a structure at the bend in order to use the phrase?
@pazzo - Sam's answer describes the correct usage - you crash into something at the bend, crash at (or on) the bend, or crash while going around the bend. But to crash into a bend is simply not right.
2d
reviewed Approve Sir, it's just pots and kettles
Apr
14
comment Is “crash into a bend” BrE and must there be a structure at the bend in order to use the phrase?
Finding 9 uses of something across the entire internet hardly makes it an idiomatic phrase. You can probably find hundreds of examples of any given grammatical mistake.
Apr
12
answered Is there any word for the opposite of a “bug” in programming?
Mar
31
answered Giving false information in good faith
Mar
29
comment “walking for five o'clock every morning.” “for”? Why not “at five o'clock”?
Indeed, the US usage would be "gets into work by 6 o'clock" (or even "at 6" depending on your emphasis).
Mar
26
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
15
answered What is the correct term to describe literary works that are only partly fictional?
Mar
3
comment Is “Stand-Your-Ground law” an official legal term? What is meant by “stand-in-your-ground”?
@Mazura - That's more of a legal question than an English language question, and I am not a lawyer. They are related but different. Here is some info for you though.
Feb
17
comment What does “Anyone who is married” mean in “Anyone who is married should know that facts and logic are not always helpful to one’s cause”?
Personally I don't get the off-topic votes. The OP correctly presumed the literal interpretation of the words so it's not like he's asking for someone to look it up in a dictionary. It may seem obvious to a native speaker, but perhaps the married joke/idiom is something that doesn't cross cultures very well, and it seems like something that would be difficult to Google for. Seems like a legitimate question to me. I have voted to reopen.
Jan
30
awarded  word-choice
Jan
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
26
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
3
comment Lack of commas or just misunderstanding
I believe this is one possible valid interpretation, but as Andreas' other answer shows, there are other possible interpretations as well. It is unclear.
Jan
3
awarded  Curious