11,028 reputation
22052
bio website wordsmyth.org
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 39
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

Full-time software engineer and part-time writer.


19h
comment Word meaning “to fall down accidentally?”
I believe that definition of slip refers to making a mistake, like a 'slip of the tongue'. In terms of falling, slip usually implies a slippery or slick surface, which didn't jump to mind when thinking of a bridge parapet. That said, I do agree it implies an accidental fall.
19h
answered Word meaning “to fall down accidentally?”
21h
awarded  Explainer
2d
comment Respect level languages in English
@GreenAsJade - I would say that's a great argument for why it's a perfect question for English Language Learners, but it still seems out of the scope for this site.
2d
comment Respect level languages in English
I agree with the others that this is more a question of etiquette and style, and therefore not a good fit for ELU. But in the interest of answering your question: yes, I would use "would like" over "want" to be more formal and polite.
Sep
15
answered What is a word for comparing two things but suggesting one is better than the other?
Aug
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
19
comment “help someone convince” vs “help someone to be convinced”?
@ErikKowal - I agree there are better ways to word it, I was trying to hold with the general structure of the original sentence.
Jul
19
comment “help someone convince” vs “help someone to be convinced”?
Yeah that sounds wrong. "helped him convince himself that", or "helped him be convinced that" would be expected.
Jul
18
comment Use of capitals and full stops in bullet points
@Pacerier - It comes down to style. Full sentences/phrases are generally capitalized and punctuated, simple items are not. Lowercase feels better there to me, but I can see the argument for "Etc." to match the other items.
Jul
16
awarded  Yearling
Jul
9
comment Differences between e.g., viz. and i.e.
@Pacerier - If you say "fruits, viz apples and oranges" then you're listing specifically the only fruits he likes. It's a limited list of examples. I.e. is simply not intended to be used for a list of examples - that's what e.g. and viz. are for. You can use it and be understood, but based on my understanding it would not be the most appropriate.
Jul
9
comment Differences between e.g., viz. and i.e.
@Pacerier - I.e. in that example doesn't quite fit. More generally, it comes down to whether you are restating the original point or merely listing examples. "He likes only orange citrus fruit, i.e. oranges" (restating/clarifying since oranges and orange citrus fruit being more or less equivalent), or "He likes fruit, e.g. apples and oranges" (apples and oranges being just two of many examples of fruit), or "He likes only certain kinds of fruit, viz. apples and strawberries." (viz implies those are the only ones he likes).
Jun
25
comment Is something 'best possible' or 'the best possible?'
@domotorp - If you say "the tallest" then you're leaving it open... tallest in his class, tallest in America, tallest ever. But if you say "the tallest (or best) possible" then you're being a bit more specific. Now you're saying it's the best that was possible to achieve.
Jun
24
comment Is something 'best possible' or 'the best possible?'
@domotorp - In the quoted section, the author equates 'best possible' with 'sharp' and says it expressly does not mean 'better...than all other results in the world' (which is what the superlative means in everyday English).
Jun
24
comment Is something 'best possible' or 'the best possible?'
Idiomatically I must disagree that "best possible" is in the same category as "most convenient". I can find no concrete rule of grammar to point to, but it simply does not sound right to my ears.
Jun
23
answered Is something 'best possible' or 'the best possible?'
Jun
22
comment What is one’s mother-in-law’s mother-in-law called?
Amusing, but probably better suited as a comment rather than an "answer'.
Jun
17
comment How does English decide whether foreign words need to be transliterated?
There is no hard and fast rule. When deciding for oneself, it would be best to look at common words and style guides, both of which are addressed in that other question you linked to.
Jun
17
comment What is the prototype of “Place blame where it is deserved / Blame where it’s due / Blame only where blame is due”?
@JoeBlow - True it can be an expression of grudging praise, but it does not have to be. Even from the OED it says "even if one is reluctant..." not "when one is reluctant". You can use it genuinely too.