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11h
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
16
awarded  Yearling
May
5
comment My uncle's widow remarried, Is she still my aunt?
An interesting philosophical question, but I don't think it really fits in the scope of language usage. As you pointed out, 'aunt' can be used regardless of technical relationship, and the dictionary definition, "the wife of one's uncle" does not go into depth about whether the marriage need be current.
May
2
comment “Wrote it I did” Is this grammatical?
I'm very interested to hear an answer that draws on actual sources of some kind besides just blindly asserting that it's right or wrong. I have no idea about the grammatical validity, but just as a native speaker both of the example phrases sound just fine (assuming there's some context -- saying "write it I did" out of the blue would probably be a bit weird.) They're also both more natural than either the versions with commas or the version with the allegedly "correct" grammar (written/write).
May
2
comment “Wrote it I did” Is this grammatical?
You say there is only a word missing but I don't get it. The original phrase was: "Wrote it I did", not "Wrote it I did it". In "Wrote it I did" there is no "I" missing, the I is simply in an unusual spot.
Apr
21
comment What is wrong with “to lie at the basis of”
@LuKas It's certainly not wrong. It just feels off because 'lie' is usually used with physical position, not with ideas. As Lucky's answer mentions, the phrase certainly exists. But compared to a more idiomatic example like lie at the heart of it pales in comparison and thus feels a bit clunky to some.
Apr
21
comment If both subjects are the same, can I still use a singular verb?
Nicole's answer is correct, but I would avoid this phrasing. Even without the 'my' it still sounds like you're referring to two different people and just got the subject-verb agreement wrong. I would suggest an alternate phrasing that clarifies that 'best friend' is a qualifier on mother and not a separate person. For instance: "My mother, my best friend, loves cooking as much as I do." Then there is no ambiguity.
Apr
21
answered What is wrong with “to lie at the basis of”
Apr
17
reviewed Approve Help with Plural Objects and Subjects
Apr
17
answered Word for birth year and death year?
Apr
16
comment Is “crash into a bend” BrE and must there be a structure at the bend in order to use the phrase?
@pazzo - #10 states that the driver "failed to negotiate a bend... and crashed into a tree". It is only later in the article that the author, while paraphrasing a direct quote from "Jill", references crashing into the bend. Perhaps those were her words or the author thought it was a nice turn of phrase. But without the context of the larger article, saying someone crashed into a bend is as silly as saying they crashed into thin air.
Apr
16
comment Is “crash into a bend” BrE and must there be a structure at the bend in order to use the phrase?
@pazzo - Sam's answer describes the correct usage - you crash into something at the bend, crash at (or on) the bend, or crash while going around the bend. But to crash into a bend is simply not right.
Apr
14
comment Is “crash into a bend” BrE and must there be a structure at the bend in order to use the phrase?
Finding 9 uses of something across the entire internet hardly makes it an idiomatic phrase. You can probably find hundreds of examples of any given grammatical mistake.
Apr
12
answered Is there any word for the opposite of a “bug” in programming?
Mar
31
answered Giving false information in good faith
Mar
29
comment “walking for five o'clock every morning.” “for”? Why not “at five o'clock”?
Indeed, the US usage would be "gets into work by 6 o'clock" (or even "at 6" depending on your emphasis).
Mar
26
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
15
answered What is the correct term to describe literary works that are only partly fictional?
Mar
3
comment Is “Stand-Your-Ground law” an official legal term? What is meant by “stand-in-your-ground”?
@Mazura - That's more of a legal question than an English language question, and I am not a lawyer. They are related but different. Here is some info for you though.