457 reputation
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bio website weblogs.asp.net/jtobler
location Las Vegas, NV
age 66
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Oct 21 '13 at 4:02

Senior enterprise architect, software engineer, programming language geek, musician, eclectic polymath, yadda yadda.


Aug
28
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
25
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
15
awarded  Yearling
Jul
15
awarded  Yearling
Sep
26
comment Etymology of “here goes nothing”?
+1 for the image version of your reference; it adds a nice touch.
Sep
20
comment What do you do when a sentence ends with a decimal?
Welcome to English Language & Usage! Thanks for contributing!
Sep
20
revised Words for not keeping up with supposed pace
Eliminated pensive because it is too much associated with sadness.
Sep
20
revised Words for not keeping up with supposed pace
deleted 1 characters in body
Sep
20
answered Words for not keeping up with supposed pace
Sep
19
comment “Whether or not” vs. “whether”
The "If/*whether you decide to come, give me a call." example given in an answer to a strongly related question makes me question this pronouncement. I would hope some logical or grammatical rule would prevent the "Whether you decide to come, give me a call." option in such a case, even though I can't cite a specific rule myself.
Sep
19
awarded  Critic
Sep
16
comment Punctuation of an exclamative question
Fouthaus still maintains an interesting x-height article, The Interrobang is Back: An American punctation mark, that gives some history and indicating renewed current interest.
Sep
16
awarded  Commentator
Sep
16
comment Punctuation of an exclamative question
I respectfully disagree. The question mark by itself simply does not express the full intent of the communication. That's exactly why the interrobang had to be invented by Martin K. Speckter in 1962.
Sep
16
comment Punctuation of an exclamative question
The Interrobang is available in a number of fonts. If you do not have one of those handy, there are two text variants in common use: '?!' for an exclamatory interrogative and '!?' for an interrogative exclamation. Pick the order to match the intended emotion. Except in the most formal communications your reader will readily understand these two usages. Examples can be found in published writing as mentioned in some of the references provided in the Interrobang Wikipedia article.
Sep
8
comment Why is “eye” pronounced so strangely?
+1 for mentioning the "Great Vowel Shift." That was a very instructive link!
Aug
30
comment What do you call a disk with a hole in the middle?
I agree with you, @ypercube (see "purist principle," note my difficulty in saying "applied" in front of "topology," and re-read my original post). However, this question did not confine itself to mathematical definitions. The OP included mathematical terms but did not require them. My answer to this interesting question was not selected; but, I'm no longer a total n00b in this group, thanks to the many kind responses from you and others!
Aug
29
comment What do you call a disk with a hole in the middle?
I agree in purist principle, @ypercube, but "torroidal" has inserted itself into the vocabulary of (I hesitate to say) "applied topology," as in "toroidal space" and "toroidal topology". This interesting article refers to the OED's discussion that the word ‘torus’ defines the shape and the word ‘toroid’ denotes "an object having the shape of a torus." By now, though, we are rather far from the OP's question!
Aug
26
answered What do you call a person who is always online on the Internet?
Aug
26
comment Why do we say someone who has read many books is “widely read”?
From a strictly intuitive perspective, I associate "widely read" with someone who has an excellent liberal arts education and who I imagine would be cognizant of many aspects of intellectual, artistic, and even scientific life. This would be in contrast to a narrow specialist who knows everything about some remote field of knowledge and nothing of literature or art.