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  • 312 votes cast
Sep
26
answered “Not hindered with any knowledge”
Sep
26
answered You think you're right but you're actually wrong
Sep
26
comment You think you're right but you're actually wrong
+1 for the math reference.
Sep
21
answered Words for personal views on life, society, world
Aug
24
comment Use of “it” before “sufficeth to say”
@A.Uysal, the King James Bible was first published in 1611, and language has shifted somewhat since then. The -eth endings gradually shifted to an -s ending (e.g. "goeth" to "goes", "thinketh" to "thinks".) While you are correct about the meaning, I wanted to point out that the usage was common to most (if not all) texts of the era including Shakespeare, and not confined to only religious texts.
Aug
24
awarded  Critic
Aug
23
answered Parsing of a compound noun with many words
Aug
23
comment More formal way of saying: “Sorry to bug you again about this, but …”
I like your sandwich approach (i.e. Nice-comment + not-so-nice-comment.) It is professional, cordial, yet communicates the intended message well.
Aug
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
answered More formal way of saying: “Sorry to bug you again about this, but …”
Aug
22
answered Word for not being happy with something but having to be satisfied with it
Aug
21
comment Whence came the usage of the word “product” in cosmetology (specifically hair care)?
+1 for Whence. Good question, though.
Aug
19
answered I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
Aug
18
answered Does the phrase “begging the question” make any sense?
Aug
17
answered Is it correct for someone to say that they've “fixed the apparent problems” with something?
Aug
17
comment Why is “zero” plural?
I don't think this is a duplicate. The first question was "Is it plural." This one is "Why is it plural." This question builds on the previous question.
Aug
17
awarded  Commentator
Aug
17
comment Why is “zero” plural?
@Fantabulum, the concept of zero as a number is much more recent than other numbers (some accounts, 9th century AD.) That may where the confusion arises.
Aug
17
answered Why is “zero” plural?
Aug
17
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
+1 for Spivak pronouns. While I disagree with the political overtones, I do like the idea of a third-person,singular gender-neutral pronoun.