2,813 reputation
517
bio website developmentfun.blogspot.com
location Charleston, WV
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Oct 14 at 16:55

I work for WV WV Office of EMS as a programmer and web developer. I've been programming since I was twelve. I use C#, Python, VB.net, VBA, VB6, C, C++ and SQL mostly.


Sep
28
answered Is there an intermediate level between junior and senior?
Sep
28
comment “Username”, “user name” or “user-name”
@Mark, I have no problem with using "User ID" or "User's identification code" when referring the the user's identification. I am, however, very big on consistency. If the development teams uses "UserName" as a field name and variable name inside the code, reference these elements in technical documents, there is a better than even chance that this phraseology will leak through to the end user. In that case, I'd prefer to use the same term they used so there won't be a document referring to the same item by two terms.
Sep
27
answered “Username”, “user name” or “user-name”
Sep
27
revised “Not hindered with any knowledge”
added 96 characters in body
Sep
27
comment “Not hindered with any knowledge”
@Mike, I agree. I do, however, like the additional formality imposed by the "not".
Sep
26
comment “Not hindered with any knowledge”
I was working on the same answer when you posted! Great minds think alike.
Sep
26
answered “Not hindered with any knowledge”
Sep
26
answered You think you're right but you're actually wrong
Sep
26
comment You think you're right but you're actually wrong
+1 for the math reference.
Sep
21
answered Words for personal views on life, society, world
Aug
24
comment Use of “it” before “sufficeth to say”
@A.Uysal, the King James Bible was first published in 1611, and language has shifted somewhat since then. The -eth endings gradually shifted to an -s ending (e.g. "goeth" to "goes", "thinketh" to "thinks".) While you are correct about the meaning, I wanted to point out that the usage was common to most (if not all) texts of the era including Shakespeare, and not confined to only religious texts.
Aug
24
awarded  Critic
Aug
23
answered Parsing of a compound noun with many words
Aug
23
comment More formal way of saying: “Sorry to bug you again about this, but …”
I like your sandwich approach (i.e. Nice-comment + not-so-nice-comment.) It is professional, cordial, yet communicates the intended message well.
Aug
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
answered More formal way of saying: “Sorry to bug you again about this, but …”
Aug
22
answered Word for not being happy with something but having to be satisfied with it
Aug
21
comment Whence came the usage of the word “product” in cosmetology (specifically hair care)?
+1 for Whence. Good question, though.
Aug
19
answered I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
Aug
18
answered Does the phrase “begging the question” make any sense?