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Me speaks English wurds good.


Apr
15
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
You seem to have missed many key points in the question. Most importantly, that there is no second person responsible for the paraphrasing.
Apr
14
revised Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
Clarified an issue that came up in the comments.
Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
@Frank, I see where you're coming from. However, part of the issue is that Joe McFamousguy has been assumed to have said the snappy version all along. It's as if, with every retelling, people said, "As Joe McFamousguy says...". So, it's not as if someone like Fred McSmartass co-opted the quote, or that I would even have a person anywhere down the line who could accurately be said to come up with the snappier version.
Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
@EdwinAshworth, if the quote was appearing within a larger body of text, I would state it as you suggest. However, the format of presentation matches the example. It's just the quote, and then the name appended.
Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
@Frank, Joe McFamousguy is the one who came up with the original idea.
Apr
14
asked Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
Mar
26
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
1
comment When to use “fate” and when to use “destiny”? Are they interchangeable?
@Kiti, I'm not sure what case you're trying to make. The example of a car accident is merely one way of describing fate and destiny in relation to a possible event in a person's life. It doesn't matter at all whether or not anyone has specifically used "fate" or "destiny" in relation to car accidents in particular. I could have used murder by elephant or decapitation by meteorite in the course of talking about fate and destiny. It really doesn't matter what the specifics are.
Feb
1
answered When to use “fate” and when to use “destiny”? Are they interchangeable?
Feb
1
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
29
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
@EdwinAshworth: I'm sorry, but your line of reasoning seems to be defending the vague and unhelpful. Yes, I know there is no one rule. That is not being debated. As I asked in my question, I am looking for reasons to go one way or the other. I don't understand how it is not clear to you that when someone asks a question like "I know I could maybe go either way, can someone help me choose?" that is completely void of information to answer with, "you can go either way."
Jan
28
accepted The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
Jan
28
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
@EdwinAshworth, saying "anything is possible" might encompass the two examples I give, but it is not a suitable response to the clarification in my original question: "If both are acceptable, is there a compelling reason I should choose one over the other?" In other words, I had anticipated both "options were possible", and had hoped to pre-empt answers as wide open as the one you linked to by clarifying what I hoped to get as an answer. Sorry, but while the answers you are pointing to unquestionably related, they are nowhere near as final as you are proposing.
Jan
28
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
@Kris, thank you for the information about scare quotes. Having looked into it, I think given the greater context, my purpose for the quote will not be misunderstood by the reader. But I appreciate you alerting me to the potential issues.
Jan
28
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
@EdwinAshworth, the other question you reference has no accepted answer, and the top answer says, essentially, "in modern English all sorts of options are possible." That falls far short of any helpful direction.
Jan
28
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
@Kris, sorry, I am not clear what you mean by "use the device as scare quotes." Are you saying it's not clear that I am actually quoting the author I am speaking about? It might just need the full context, too long to reproduce here, but in any case my aim is to make clear that the author said exactly what is in the quotes.
Jan
28
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
Er...just a correction on my comment: I meant my "question" should stand on its own, not my "answer".
Jan
28
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
@EdwinAshworth Respectfully, sometimes I don't get the rules here. That question was closed as off topic and therefore I ignored it in my search for answers. Either that question does have a valid answer, in which case it shouldn't be closed, or it is off topic in which case my answer should stand on its own. And in any case, I can't see how either question about commas is off topic for the site.
Jan
28
asked The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
Dec
29
comment Why does the contraction of “I will” sound strange in certain sentence constructions?
@JanusBahsJacquet, I'm sure you're correct about that, but I don't see how it is clear that "I will" has primary stress over "when I go". It seems to me it could be either, depending on the context. If there's a reason why "I will" would always be the primary stress, that would seem to be an explanation worthy of answering this question separately from the other.