757 reputation
519
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years
seen Jul 28 at 9:11

Me speaks English wurds good.


Jul
14
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
9
comment What's a suffix that means to find something cute or adorable?
萌え is only used in English, if at all, among a very niche subculture. I live in Tokyo where the incidence of non-Japanese with a familiarity and integration with Japanese language is higher than anywhere else, including some people very enthusiastic about the anime and manga subculture, and absolutely no one uses 萌え as part of English. They use 元気, すみません, and other Japanese words mixed in their English, but never 萌え.
Jun
8
comment What's a suffix that means to find something cute or adorable?
It's an interesting suggestion, but since the suggested Japanese term is a phrase that does not exist in Japanese as any kind of routine expression, why would one look to Japanese as a way to express this concept instead of, say, Arabic, Chinese, or Swahili? Since I can't say "In Japanese they had a word for this...", it seems odd and arbitrary to say "So, I made up a word in Japanese..."
Jun
7
comment What's a suffix that means to find something cute or adorable?
I'm not sure I understand your question, but to clarify further on my comment, I mean that a suffix like "~ie", as in "cutie" describes the person who is thought of as being cute, not the person who thinks it. However, a "xenophile" describes the person who is the source of the feeling, the one who loves outsiders. Thus, similarily, I need a word that is like "xeno-adorer". Hmmm.. actually, now that I say it, "xeno-adorer" feels kind of close.
Jun
7
comment What's a suffix that means to find something cute or adorable?
Thank you for this response. One thing I notice about all the listed suffixes here is that they describe the target, not the source. I need a word, or part of a word, that describes the source of the feelings. The suggested words built out of the prefix "~xeno" are interesting, but to be honest, they seem confused as to whether they point to sources or targets.
Jun
7
asked What's a suffix that means to find something cute or adorable?
May
11
comment Does “renege” have any racial overtones, or is it otherwise offensive?
@JoeTaxpayer, that is exactly the kind of fight I am talking about. Cowering in anticipation of how things "might not go well" is exactly the reason why stupidity runs rampant. Yes, it could be awkward, but that is not your fault for using the word, it's their fault for being uneducated. Stand up for yourself and educate them.
Apr
15
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
You seem to have missed many key points in the question. Most importantly, that there is no second person responsible for the paraphrasing.
Apr
14
revised Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
Clarified an issue that came up in the comments.
Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
@Frank, I see where you're coming from. However, part of the issue is that Joe McFamousguy has been assumed to have said the snappy version all along. It's as if, with every retelling, people said, "As Joe McFamousguy says...". So, it's not as if someone like Fred McSmartass co-opted the quote, or that I would even have a person anywhere down the line who could accurately be said to come up with the snappier version.
Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
@EdwinAshworth, if the quote was appearing within a larger body of text, I would state it as you suggest. However, the format of presentation matches the example. It's just the quote, and then the name appended.
Apr
14
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
@Frank, Joe McFamousguy is the one who came up with the original idea.
Apr
14
asked Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
Mar
26
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
1
comment When to use “fate” and when to use “destiny”? Are they interchangeable?
@Kiti, I'm not sure what case you're trying to make. The example of a car accident is merely one way of describing fate and destiny in relation to a possible event in a person's life. It doesn't matter at all whether or not anyone has specifically used "fate" or "destiny" in relation to car accidents in particular. I could have used murder by elephant or decapitation by meteorite in the course of talking about fate and destiny. It really doesn't matter what the specifics are.
Feb
1
answered When to use “fate” and when to use “destiny”? Are they interchangeable?
Feb
1
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
29
comment The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?
@EdwinAshworth: I'm sorry, but your line of reasoning seems to be defending the vague and unhelpful. Yes, I know there is no one rule. That is not being debated. As I asked in my question, I am looking for reasons to go one way or the other. I don't understand how it is not clear to you that when someone asks a question like "I know I could maybe go either way, can someone help me choose?" that is completely void of information to answer with, "you can go either way."
Jan
28
accepted The author writes that he “couldn't understand why…" — a comma needed before the quote?