339 reputation
15
bio website martinstoller.ca
location Earth
age 84
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Mar 26 at 15:39

What to write... what to write? Does anyone read these at all?

With over twenty years of programming experience, I think I've finally earned the title "veteran" (got the scars to prove it, too). And that, even though I've only been gaining my daily bread with full time programming during the last 16 years. Before that I was doing admin and support work, getting my hands and knees dirty pulling a plethora (and yes, I do mean "abundance") of cabling through ducts that greased spaghetti would have had trouble passing through. Beating reluctant UNIX and Novell servers with a one pound mallet until they agreed to work in rooms radiating a pleasant 38 degrees Celsius. With soothing, well modulated words calming down workers close to suicide who had unwittingly rebooted their machines before saving their gargantuan spreadsheets. During these perspiring years I often put together small tools and apps to help make my admin life easier. And in the early years of my computerized life (during high school) I programmed for fun in languages and on machines that have now been more or less forgotten. All those years I've dreamt of designing and creating the "PERFECT OPERATING SYSTEM"! But that is another story…


Jul
25
awarded  Caucus
Jul
13
awarded  Yearling
Feb
8
comment How to express something given to a customer for “free in a non-immoral, non-sexual, non-promoting context”?
I agree with "complimentary" as being quite close to the OP's question. I'm a German speaker, too, so I see both sides. ie: "Complimentary breakfast" at a hotel. Of course, in the end, when you really do the math, nothing is free :)
Sep
26
comment You think you're right but you're actually wrong
+1 with caveat: personally I feel that BRAZEN is more fitting to what the OP is looking for (as in "stupidly bold"). To me, BAREFACED denotes that most people don't believe the lie. The lie is so obvious, it is "written on the liar's bare face".
Sep
15
comment What is the meaning of 'is' in this sentence?
"You can ne'er get all the typohs... They creep in, in the darkest o' night, whilst you be asheep, and add themselves inconspicuously in the most infuriatingly of playses." - Fainswift.
Sep
15
comment Dissecting an English sentence using a pattern?
@nnnnnn And "green" can be a verb, too: ie: To green a lawn. (sorry, I tried to suppress adding this note, but it was stronger then me...)
Jul
27
comment When is it appropriate to end a question without a question mark?
+1 for the examples, rofl...
Jul
21
comment Gender neutral reflexive pronoun — equivalent to “himself” and “herself”
+1 as the only logical alternative would be "itself" - and that probably won't fly in general usage :)
Jul
21
comment “Badger someone”
Must be common in the US, too - there is a Penguins of Madagascar episode focused completely on the term...
Jul
21
comment Can “Sure” be used to respond to “Thanks”?
I catch myself - and often hear - "Sure thing!" in the sense of "Don't mention it, glad to do it!" as a response to a sincere "Thank you!" - it is colloquial, possibly even a bit rural, I assume...
Jul
20
awarded  Commentator
Jul
20
comment Why does the verb “overlook” have such a different meaning from “oversee”?
+1 Interesting, but not unexpected - obviously the more divided meanings congealed later on.
Jul
20
comment Why does the verb “overlook” have such a different meaning from “oversee”?
Thanks for the edit :) using italics certainly looks better...
Jul
20
answered Why does the verb “overlook” have such a different meaning from “oversee”?
Jul
20
comment What does “creeping on one's turf” mean?
Nevermind - I see in sports "creeping on his turf" is used, where-as in literature "creeping up on his turf" is the norm...
Jul
20
comment What does “creeping on one's turf” mean?
Don't play "foursquare", but shouldnt it say "you are creeping up on their turf"? Otherwise the sentence without up simply means you are on their turf, creeping - using that mode of locomotion instead of walking, running, crawling, etc...
Jul
19
comment When did “kid” start to mean “child”?
@Hendrik - Ich habe schon immer behauptet die Deutschen schauen zu viel Ami Fernseher... (and in English->) They watch too much American TV :)
Jul
18
comment When did “kid” start to mean “child”?
Two other possibilities -> from the Germanic "das Kind", dropping the soft "n", or also because children make a mess and frolic about in similar fashion to goat kids...
Jul
18
comment Word similar to “farewell” but with negative connotation
Initials - yes looks like plural of MS (for Manuscripts)...
Jul
18
answered Any authoritative source on British rules on space before question mark?