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Mar
3
comment Is this contraction of 'there is' acceptable to native speakers of English?
Is this deemed different from eg There's no accounting for taste ... ... like there's no tomorrow ... There's no place like home (ToTo). And similar, which are rife, relatively anyway :-).
Feb
12
comment Name for a word whose sound is contrary to its meaning
eg note how "Celtic" is usually pronounced, (ˈkɛltic) & how it somehow "resonates" and why it is different. Except when pronounced as it occasionally is (ˈsɛltic), which brings it "into line" with standard Anglo Saxon pronunciation, although it is not an Anglo Saxon word.
Feb
12
comment Name for a word whose sound is contrary to its meaning
"Money is the most beautiful word" almost certainly does not refer to its beauty as a sound in isolation from considering its meaning. I'd hazard (entirely an opinion) that words such as Nefertiti or Hiawatha * would be gentler on the ear and so "more beautiful" and that words such as Phalanx, Ajax, VAX, ... which use the classic "power" letters (A, J, X ?) would be more striking. * Both are non-English in primary use so perhaps heard differently to "usual" words. ... ->
Feb
11
comment Can “the least I could do” be negative?
You have not provided enough detail for ANYONE to answer your specific question with certainty. If you want a useful answer the least you must do is to provide the phrase in context - at least the whole sentence it is in and better, the few sentences around it. Note that my approximate above use of the phrase is NOT in fact the same 'figure of speech" and is LIGHTLY negative. But "It was/is the least that I could do" is almost invariably used in a positive sense. If some one says "He did the least that he could do" then that is not actually the same as the phrase in question.
Feb
4
comment Is there a specialized term for intellectual people who do not care about their own physical comfort?
Spartan. And I'll agree with John's ascetic to make this > 15 characters.
Feb
4
comment Other than “Final Point”?
Wrapping up, At the end of the day, To conclude ..., In conclusion, Final thoughts, From the Fountainhead [:-) - genuinely the name of an opinion column by a computer industry shooting-star long ago), It's a wrap, Finally
Feb
3
comment What's the shortest word that can stand for “to leave a legacy”?
Excel sounds excellent :-)
Feb
3
comment Why is it wrong to use “The India”
@JonHanna - "America" stretches from Tierra del Fuego to Point Barrow. Even closer to home we still have to deal with the Canadians. And depending on who is counting, the Mexicans, and possibly the next seven countries as well (as far as Panama). Then there's "The Americas ..." :-). FWIW (not much probably) Gargoyle NGams: The US, The USA, The Americas are interesting.
Feb
3
comment Why is it wrong to use “The India”
If ' "the United States of America", refers to the group of states, not the country's name. ', then what IS the country's name? I suggest that you may find the distinction less clear cut than it appears.
Feb
2
answered Why is it wrong to use “The India”
Feb
1
comment What does “fiend angelical” stand for?
While comments about it being an oxymoron are probably correct, it's worth noting that Satan's name is "Lucifer". The bible tell us that Lucifer - a / the angel of Light - highest of the angels, who sought to usurp Jehovah's position and was banished. So "fiend angelical" is an apt description of Satan - but probably not what Juliet (or Shakespeare) intended.
Feb
1
revised What does “Stumble into the buzzsaw” mean? Is it a popular idiom?
added 788 characters in body
Feb
1
answered What does “Stumble into the buzzsaw” mean? Is it a popular idiom?
Feb
1
revised What do you call a person who does not take risks (or who does not like taking risks)?
deleted 1 characters in body
Feb
1
comment What do you call a person who does not take risks (or who does not like taking risks)?
Changed "adverse" to "averse".
Jan
29
comment 'Sort out' or 'sought out', which one is correct?
In this case the multi-hyphenated strings are purposefully "OTT" and are intended to create a desired effect. I think they do a good job of doing so in this sort of context. It's not so much as case of the writer belonging to the "hyphens-are-good-so-I'll-use-more" school as aiming at setting up encapsulated scenarios that are each visually and mentally identifiable as such by dint of the hyphens. Perhaps :-).
Jan
29
answered Is it appropriate to state a mathematical fact with the word “whenever”?
Jan
29
revised Do these adjectives refer to ice?
added 76 characters in body
Jan
29
comment Do these adjectives refer to ice?
@user36521 - I had no problem philosophically with the original quote not being attributed. The question being asked made it obvious that it was not his material There was no plagiarism. However, attribution would have been useful, along with a link tp the specific passage, so that it could be read in context more easily.
Jan
29
answered Do these adjectives refer to ice?