2,431 reputation
311
bio website j.mp/NZPHOTOS
location Auckland, New Zealand
age
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jan 17 at 14:21

Electronic designer. Professional Engineer. Oldish aka "reasonably experienced" :-).
Contact - apptechnz gmail com <- you know the drill.
Tel: +64 9 837 2999 gmt+13

Special interest in technological solutions for developing country applications. Extensive in-China experience in product development & manufacturing in China.

Jack of all trades, Master of Electrical engineering. (aka ME (elec)) Interested in all aspects of modern technology. Professional qualifications in electrical engineering but practically proficient or conversant in many peripheral areas.

Recent extensive experience in solar powered LED lighting development and manufacturing in China for markets worldwide.

"Servant of the Most High God" / committed Christian. Happy to work enthusiastically and interact amicably with people of all nationalities and creeds.

Married with 2 adult children.

Obsessional photographer.


Jan
29
answered Do these adjectives refer to ice?
Jan
28
comment What term describes “a loss of immersion” while reading?
Distracted, Brought back to reality,
Jan
27
comment Using an adjective to describe something that is already intended
Similar to "eponymous".
Jan
27
comment Does a pedestrian walk 'in' the road, or 'on' the road (both are correct, but which is right?)
@JonHanna - we don't have any worth mentioning. We have two main political parties National & Labour, which very very roughly align with Republican and Democrat. And we have a number of smaller parties who are represented in parliament under our proportional voting system. All our politicians speak New-Zealand-speak BUT the general public perception is that they tend to talk it out of the side of their mouths. That may or may not be unfair, but it's how it is seen to be.
Jan
27
comment “Scheduled to” vs. “scheduled for”
@BarrieEngland - Your concern understood. I'm all too aware of the depravity of these sumbags than most (as part of a much greater subject area). I'd not wish to give them any sort of traction in people's minds. But the term is so common in the sort of context that I used it, that to consciously not use it may give the scum more power just ignoring them. You'd have a vast task ahead of you if you sought to eliminate the term from the language. eg "Grammar N'" manages 3.2M Google hits and 20+ pages on every single hit is still relevant.ie it is absolutely embedded as part of common language.
Jan
27
comment What do you call people who are constantly moving [i.e., “in motion”]?
+1 FOR THE -1. ______________
Jan
26
answered Is there a word for numbers between 10 and 99?
Jan
26
comment How to properly say that a given day/date does not exist?
Accepting an answer about 20 minutes after you have asked a question may decrease the chance of you getting the best possible answer or of getting a wide range of useful information. I care not personally, but some people are influenced by an answer having been accepted.
Jan
26
answered How to properly say that a given day/date does not exist?
Jan
26
comment “Scheduled to” vs. “scheduled for”
@BarrieEngland - The following is put poorly with bad terminology - some linguistic Nazi (they have their place :-) ) may wish to suggest a properly worded version. | Even "Scheduled to" in the example you give seems to obey the "rule" that I suggest in my answer. In your example "scheduled" is, very unusually, a verb in isolation its own right, so the "to" form applies. Usually you get "scheduled to 'verb' ". Here the scheduling is its own subject. The scheduling is what its about.
Jan
26
revised One word for “any way around it”
added 109 characters in body
Jan
26
answered “Scheduled to” vs. “scheduled for”
Jan
26
comment Does a pedestrian walk 'in' the road, or 'on' the road (both are correct, but which is right?)
@BarrieEngland - QE is a good enough term for we non-serious linguists. Few would not know what it meant with some precision in this context. We know what we speak and what those US fellows speak, and it's not the same (in part), whereas NZ English is very very largely indistinguishable from English English. We have some additional words due to different culturual inputs but no spellings are NZ specific or other than you'd find in England AFAIK. (I say England to be safe - I'll not guarantee our conformance with Welsh or scottish or Irish (either part) local practice).
Jan
25
answered One word for “any way around it”
Jan
25
comment Does a pedestrian walk 'in' the road, or 'on' the road (both are correct, but which is right?)
@BarrieEngland - We SPEAK NZ English (ie pronunciation) but largely write British English - spelling and most usage. Much closer to Queen's English than President's English. All will be pleased to know that linguistic pronunciation drift is such that in time Queen's English will be spoken as we speak it now. I'm told. We are just the forerunners. || Would downvoter please explain reason. I really really do not mind downvotes on this sort of thing as long as they are logical - and I'd like to know why for future guidance.
Jan
25
answered Does a pedestrian walk 'in' the road, or 'on' the road (both are correct, but which is right?)
Jan
24
answered What is a more politically correct way to call something a “Red-Headed Step-Child”?
Jan
24
answered Adjective for “a person who really suffers when it is cold”
Jan
24
answered Filler-gap dependencies and recoverability of meaning
Jan
24
answered Where does the word “valuable” fit best?