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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Oct 9 at 15:42

Oct
9
answered Quiz Show Jeopardy: Are the 1910s called “nineteen-tens” or 'nineteen-teens'?
Oct
9
answered “A” or “an” with adjective in parenthesis
Oct
7
comment Words that describe the “barterer” and the one doing the “bartering”
The soliciting party and the solicited party.
Oct
7
answered “make somebody feel an idiot” or “make somebody feel like an idiot”?
Oct
7
answered What do you call the best pupil in a class in a single word?
Jul
7
awarded  Yearling
May
19
answered conditioning, conditions and circumstances
May
16
answered could have done vs could do
Jan
21
answered “By/before/until/through” in the past
Dec
20
answered One word for “embrace challenges”
Dec
20
comment Is Missouri called /mi.'zuɹ.ə/ outside of Missouri?
I've spent time in Illinois, Arkansas and Georgia. In all those places it's /miz.'uɹ.ē/. For precisely the same reason that it's \ˌmi-sə-ˈsi-pē\. or \mī-ˈa-mē\
Dec
20
answered What. Is. This. Style. Called?
Dec
20
revised Is “nowadays” the same as “today”?
deleted 2 characters in body
Dec
20
answered File kept on/at the server?
Dec
20
comment File kept on/at the server?
I've never heard "to the server" after decades in IT.
Dec
20
answered Is “nowadays” the same as “today”?
Dec
20
comment Come on, don’t be such a nimrod!
I agree with MετάEd: I suspect common usage came with Bugs Bunny. Plus, it sounds a little like "numbskull" or the like. Where I'm from it's also common to call someone a "dilrod", which is morphed a step further. IMHO the 1933 citation is in the hunter sense: He's a "hunter" of women, and won't leave this one alone..."
Jul
7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
21
comment Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses “overwhelm” as its root?
to quote an old hymn, "..'Neath the whelming flood...." If you simply say "whelming" it carries the "over" meaning with it. So go to the root: An "overwhelming" feeling is in fact a "flood" of feelings.
Dec
20
comment How do you define broke and broke into?
Just my impression, but I think using the phrase "broke into (x region)" comes not so much from breaking into a physical location as it does the aviation term, "breaking into" as in "We broke into clear air above 4,000 ft..." Like a plane "breaks into" a new stratum, so the speaker "broke into" the six figure stratum...