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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Sep 27 '12 at 2:38

Jul
6
awarded  Yearling
May
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
6
awarded  Yearling
May
2
comment Why does legal English continue to remain archaic?
@Kaz Just out of interest, I recently came across an interesting approach to toning down the legalese: 500px.com/privacy (and their terms page).
Mar
28
awarded  Critic
Mar
13
answered Can the term “jack/jerk off” be used for female masturbation?
Mar
6
comment What is the word that describes ethical smartness?
Surely, what is righteous (or morally right) is subjective. In fiction, was Ozymandias ("the smartest man on the planet") righteous in bringing about world peace by massacring half of NYC (by way of his genius)?
Dec
7
comment Is there a single word when the clock hands meet?
Chronometric-indicator-synchronism?
Nov
21
comment Can the “don't” contraction be expanded when used as a command?
Oddly, You don't you love me, Juanromeo? and You do not love me, Juanromeo? seems to work. Although in speech you would be reliant on intonation to make it understood as a question.
Oct
18
comment A word meaning the opposite action of recruiting
+1 for alienate
Oct
18
comment Word or phrase for clumsy, inaccurate expression
+1 for abstruse
Oct
13
answered I can't understand a sentence with “never more ~ than ~”
Jul
25
comment Word to describe short bursts of running?
Back in high school when my friends and I used to walk everywhere, we used to refer to this as wogging; walk/jogging. That's probably not a good one to use widely though, because the word wog has too much other baggage.
Jul
19
comment Etymology of 'wipe the floor with'?
I could buy the literal explanation above, but could it not just be likening the defeated person to a dirty rag; worthy only of wiping muck off the floor? I'm sure with a bit of thought, all kinds of "smack talk" can be thought of along those lines. "He made him his bitch" for instance, suggesting the defeated is now a servant or similar in that connotation.
Jul
14
comment “Thousands of thousands” vs. “Thousands upon thousands”
The answers by AUAnonymous and pavium hit on the crux of the matter. I might also add, that to me "thousands upon thousands" has a stronger connotation of compounding, and possibly even of indefinite thousands. I would be inclined to use the former in a literal sense and the latter in a more figurative sense.
Jul
14
comment What is the origin of the term “back to back”, meaning to follow one after the other?
Perhaps it did originate from fighting back to back. Fighting back to back infers closeness, at least in the camaraderie sense. Also, you would have to be closely following (paying attention to) your fighting partner to remain back to back for any length of time during a fight. A bit of a stretch maybe.
Jul
14
answered “Listen to them not”
Jul
14
comment Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection?
Strictly (or perhaps pedantically) speaking I'd say it was intonation rather than inflection.
Jul
12
awarded  Commentator
Jul
12
comment What does “Eat our peas” mean - where does it come from?
It might be of interest that, at least by the late 90s, it was a popular enough phrase to be have a popular (at the time) Australian comedy compilation released with the name Eat Your Peas.